Hollywood isn’t famous for courage — especially when it means standing up to someone as powerful as Rupert Murdoch who owns one of the biggest movie and television companies. So it’ll be interesting to see how far actors Jude Law and Hugh Grant take their lawsuits charging that Murdoch papers hacked their phone conversations. There’ve been a few developments this week in those cases: The FBI plans to talk to Law about his suit last week alleging that News Of The World based a 2003 story about the actor on hacked phone messages, the BBC reports. The matter could go to U.S. courts because Law says the paper listened to mobile phone messages between him and an assistant made on a domestic network while both were at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport. Last month Law’s former girlfriend, Sienna Miller, accepted a $164,000 settlement from NOTW from a different claim that the paper had hacked her phone. Law says that the problems at Murdoch’s newspaper empire weren’t limited to NOTW: Last month he sued the Sun for violating his privacy, alleging that it based four stories in 2005 and 2006 on his secret phone messages. The Sun fired back that Law’s charges are ”deeply cynical and deliberately mischievous” adding that the paper’s investigation found that Law’s claims “have no foundation whatsoever.” That case will go to the UK’s High Court in January.

The High Court also weighed in this week on Grant’s suit against Scotland Yard to obtain evidence about NOTW‘s efforts to hack his phone.  Justice Geoffrey Vos told police on Wednesday to let the actor and writer Jemima Khan see information about the newspaper’s efforts to access their voice messages. Grant helped to draw attention to the matter in April when he wrote an article in the New Statesman with quotes from a NOTW reporter who had admitted that hacking at the newspaper had taken place on an “industrial scale.”