A report in Sky News today said that lawyers representing the News of the World‘s phone-hacking victims in the UK are planning to cross the pond and sue parent company News Corp and directors including James and Rupert Murdoch. In addition to the hacking claims, investigators are probing whether bribes offered to police officials by company representatives constitute a violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act — which can be enforced even if the bribes are made overseas. The lawyer for murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, whose phone was hacked by journalists at the now-defunct NOTW tabloid owned by News Corp arm News International, is part of the legal push, telling Sky the action “will raise issues about the role of a parent company over its subsidiaries.” He has hired New York lawyer Norman Siegel, who represented several families of 9/11 victims, to investigate legal options stateside. Reports are coming out of the UK daily about the hacking scandal and its reverberations, but any time the words “Murdoch” and “U.S.” are involved, it fuels fears of stockholders and board members, who already are wary that the scandal could have far-reaching implications for the future of the media giant, which is based in New York.