It’s the latest and potentially most high-profile lawsuit yet to come out of the UK phone-hacking scandal that has engulfed News Corp’s British newspapers. The company has already settled more than 50 lawsuits related to probes that uncovered the widespread hacking of celebrities’ and political figures’ voicemails by News Of The World journalists — and officials think the number of victims is much higher. But Cherie Blair’s suit, filed yesterday against News Corp’s News International unit and convicted hacker Glenn Mulcaire, could shine a spotlight onto just how high the illicit practices might have gone; already, News Corp settled claims by then-Prime Minister Tony Blair’s former press chief and Deputy PM. “If it is true that a former prime minister’s family have been targeted by Rupert Murdoch’s hackers, then it is clearly a significant moment in the scandal,” said Labour Party MP Tom Watson, a vocal leader of a parliamentary committee investigating the scandal, wrote in an e-mail to Bloomberg. The scandal has resulted in several different investigations, and most recently eight journalists at Murdoch’s The Sun newspaper were arrested and suspended for their alleged roles in  bribing police officials. Murdoch lifted that ban last week and announced The Sun would launch a Sunday edition to replace News Of The World’s now-defunct Sunday tabloid. It debuts this week.