Yeah, the video streaming site is named after IAC/InterActiveCorp CEO Barry Diller — a backer of the Aereo streaming video service — but with an “r” added to the last name. And digital entrepreneur Alki David says he offered this week to pay the major broadcast networks for the right to include their programming on the site — which he insists will become a major, Aereo-like service that will have promotional help from Charlie Sheen and Ice T. The networks should do business with him and his company FilmOn, according to a letter that he says he sent to them this week, because “There is little doubt that the proverbial genie is out of the bottle and that what benefits the consumer is for that genie to remain at large.” Will the networks play ball? Of course not. They just got him to agree to a settlement involving two lawsuits: He promised to pull the plug on a subscription streaming service that used their over-the-air signals without their permission, and pay them $1.6M, to resolve copyright infringement claims they raised against him in 2010. In addition, he agreed to extract himself from a separate suit that he initiated against CBS Interactive, which he alleged distributed software for Limewire — a peer-to-peer file sharing service that was itself found guilty of inducing users to infringe on copyrights.

You may recall that last week David said he was “reneging on any agreement and I’m fighting them,” after he learned that the terms of the settlement had gotten out. He vowed to “go all out to drag [CBS] through the court system,” charging that the broadcaster has a “culture of deceit and underhandedness.” But David says he relented because the case can go on without him. “Once the lawsuit goes into discovery, all of the skeletons will be coming out,” he says. Besides, now he wants to do business with them and “they got what they want which is a pound of flesh.”