That’s true for decisions including the movies that theaters choose to carry, the screens they assign to boomer-oriented films, the concessions they offer and the size of their seats, Capstone Global Marketing and Research CEO Catherine Paura told a CinemaCon audience this morning. “Unlike past generations we have not stopped going to the movies…Young people because of technology, because of the different ways they can entertain themselves are not as habituated to going to the movies as the older generation.” And women are most likely to drive sales because “men tend not to go as much with their friends.” Paura urged theaters to consider more sophisticated concessions for the 55+ crowd, including espresso, red wine, cookies or cake, cheese or “something that doesn’t make my cholesterol go up.” Boomers also like to see movies on big screens. More broadly, Paura says that studios and theaters need to pay more attention to the quality and presentation of movie trailers. Since they establish impressions early, and are frequently watched online, a trailer is “more important than the TV commercial. It’s more important than any other information.” In contrast to findings from the Worldwide Motion Picture Group, she says that the DVR “is not our friend.” Even when viewers don’t skip over movie ads their viewing “can be 7 to 10 days after the show…It’s very, very different. So the trailer is absolutely essential.”

Related: DVR Owners Don’t Zap TV Ads For Upcoming Movies: Study

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