Not bad for six months of work. To be fair, though, the tally includes $14M in restricted stock units to replace some of the compensation that Marissa Mayer forfeited in July when she left Google to take the top job at Yahoo, according to the proxy filed today at the SEC. There’s also a one time retention award of worth $30M that vests over five years. Her package for last year included $454,862 salary, $35M stock awards, $1.1M in non equity incentives, and $40,540 in other compensation. Almost all of the last category is for personal security services. Mayer wasn’t even Yahoo’s highest paid employee last year: The crown goes to COO Henrique de Castro who made $39.2M after joining in November from Google. Yahoo laid out a lot of cash to take care of all the execs who came and left last year. Former Interim CEO Ross Levinsohn, who held the top job from May to July, made $13.4M including a $1.5M severance payment. His predecessor Scott Thompson, who served from January to May, made $24.3M. Shareholders will have a chance to register their opinions about the outlays in an advisory vote at the annual meeting to be held June 25 in Santa Clara, Calif. Also on the agenda is a vote on a shareholder resolution asking Yahoo to publish an annual Corporate Social Responsibility report. The company opposes the move, saying that it is “working proactively to advance numerous initiatives and policies aimed at protecting human rights and advancing the fundamental principles of freedom of expression and privacy globally.” Another proposal would require Yahoo to disclose its political contributions. That would “bring our Company in line with a growing number of leading companies, including Exelon, Merck, and Microsoft, that support political disclosure and accountability,” the proposal says. The board also opposes the plan saying that it “contains ambiguities that would be difficult in practice to implement.”

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