It’s not the lead of the NY Timesreport on Time Warner Cable and other cable and satellite distributors’ tactics to make it difficult for web rivals — most notably Intel’s venure — to enter the industry. But it could be one of the most interesting wrinkles in the story, which picked up steam this week at The Cable Show in Washington DC. That’s where Time Warner Cable boss Glenn Britt suggested during a Q&A that his company designed carriage deals with language that could prevent alternate programmers from getting access to the same content. “We actually have roughly 300 different deals for different networks and I hesitate to make any generalizations”, Britt said Tuesday. “We may well have ones that have that prohibition. We have other ones that probably, say, if you go over-the-top then we get those same rights. And all the variations on that you can imagine. This is not a cookie-cutter kind of business”. Time Warner Cable yesterday defended itself against the anticompetitive claims being bandied about since then, saying in part in a statement: “The amount and scope of exclusivity and windowing in Time Warner Cable’s arrangements with programmers pales by comparison to that found between other players in the entertainment ecosystem”. Stay tuned on this one.