Reception To Celebrate The Release Of Chuck Lorre's "What Doesn't Kill Us Makes Us Bitter"Angus T. Jones, formerly the highest-paid child actor in TV history, says he was a “paid hypocrite” during his time on CBS‘ comedy Two And A Half Men because he “wasn’t OK” with being “part of something that was making light of topics in our world where there are really problems for a lot of people.” Jones, now 20 and a student at the University of Colorado in Boulder, talked to Houston TV station KHOU over the weekend; he was in town to speak at the World Harvest Outreach, a Seventh-Day Adventist congregation, the station said. “I really want to come into the light because I know that is where the healing is and I’ve seen God do amazing things,” Jones said. World Harvest Outreach Church Pastor James R. Doggett Sr told the station, “I’m not sure [Jones] cares a whole lot about being an actor or being well known, in that regard.” Watch here:

But, of course, if he were not a well-known actor whoangusjones co-starred in one of the country’s most successful recent comedy series, no one would care about his thoughts about the role of TV comedy in larger society. And, of course, his celebrity is bringing this Houston church pots of attention — like the KHOU interview — and this post. Ditto the Forerunner Chronicles church, which, in November 2012, posted the video that went viral, in which Jones announced, “If you watch Two And A Half Men, please stop watching. I’m on Two And A Half Men and I don’t want to be on it. Please stop watching it. Please stop filling your head with filth.” Some actors also got traction off of Jones’ video with parodies.

Jones later apologized in a statement in which he expressed his gratitude to Two And A Half Men, co-creator Chuck Lorre, CBS, series producer Warner Bros TV and studio chief Peter Roth for “what has been one of the most significant experiences in my life to date.” He also apologized “if my remarks reflect me showing indifference to and disrespect of my colleagues and a lack of appreciation of the extraordinary opportunity of which I have been blessed.” But this past Sunday, he said that while he is “apologetic” for having “totally insulted [Lorre's] baby, “otherwise I don’t regret saying what I said.”

When he left the show, Jones was making about $350,000 per episode. Over the weekend, Jones told the TV station he’s not giving up acting for good. “There’s a few different productions that I’d like kind of Bible-based stories. Stuff like that.”