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Global Showbiz Briefs: Glum News For ‘Glee’ In The UK?; Thelma Schoonmaker To Be Honored At Venice; More

Global Showbiz Briefs: Glum News For ‘Glee’ In The UK?; Thelma Schoonmaker To Be Honored At Venice; MoreIn 2011, Mark Tughan, whose Comic Enterprises owns four Glee Clubs in the UK, filed a lawsuit against Fox over musical dramedy Glee, claiming the name of the show infringed on his trademark, creating a confusion that his venues are somehow associated with the series. On Friday, Britain’s High Court ruled that the show must change its name. The Associated Press reports a judge told 20th Century Fox that it had to re-name the series in Britain, though the order has been stayed until an appeal has been heard. Comic Enterprises is also seeking damages, with a final amount to be determined later, the AP said. In the interim, the judge ordered Fox to pay £100,000 ($171,000). A Fox spokesperson told Deadline, “We are pleased that the trial judge agreed to let the Appeal Court rule before ordering any relief that would adversely affect fans’ enjoyment of Glee in the UK. We look forward to the next stage of this case and remain confident in the merits of our argument.” Season 6 of Glee will be its last, so the title issue could be moot for the show’s primary run given the length of the appeal process, though it would affect Glee’s syndicated run in the country.

thelma schoonmakerThelma Schoonmaker, Martin Scorsese’s venerated and longtime editor, will receive a Golden Lion Lifetime Achievement Award at this year’s Venice Film Festival, as will … Read More »

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Second Stage Nails Down ‘American Psycho’ Musical U.S. Premiere

By | Monday July 14, 2014 @ 10:00am PDT

Second Stage Nails Down ‘American Psycho’ Musical U.S. PremiereOff-Broadway powerhouse Second Stage will present the U.S. premiere of the much praised (and much debated) American Psycho, the musical adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’ 1991 novel (and 2000 Christian Bale-starring film) about excess, murder and flashing the right labels. The show — with music by Duncan Sheik, book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, staging by Rupert Goold and a starring performance by Matt “Dr. Who” Smith – opened last December at London’s Almeida Theatre and was considered a shoo-in for Broadway next season. It still may be.

"Lost River" Premiere - The 67th Annual Cannes Film FestivalFor now, however, the show will begin performances in February 2015 and open in March at Second Stage’s West 43rd Street home base. It will be mounted in association with Act 4 Entertainment by special arrangement with Edward R. Pressman (who produced the film). Act 4 is a Los Angeles-based film and new media development company founded by David Johnson and committed to projects that “motivate and inspire audiences across the world toward social action.”

That’s a challenge for the Ellis novel, which prompted furious protests from feminist and human rights groups in reaction to its explicit, play-by-play depiction of the brutal torture and murder of women at the hands of protagonist Patrick Bateman, which the book’s defenders insisted was satire of a society gone mad with material obsession and moral vacuity. The musical has inspired almost inevitable comparisons to Sweeney Todd. Read More »

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Specialty Box Office Preview: ‘Boyhood’, ‘Land Ho!’, ‘A Long Way Home’, ‘Closed Curtain’

By | Thursday July 10, 2014 @ 8:04pm PDT

Specialty Box Office Preview: ‘Boyhood’, ‘Land Ho!’, ‘A Long Way Home’, ‘Closed Curtain’It’s not every week that a major milestone in filmmaking opens in theaters, but this is one. Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a dozen years in the making, finally makes its ways to an initial handful of theaters in New York and Los Angeles. The IFC Films release has a lot of momentum behind it, with word-of-mouth and buzz that should translate into a successful opening; word has it that advance sales are “strong”. It will be joined by a filmmaking milestone of a much different sort in Variance Films’ Closed Curtain, an acclaimed feature created by Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi, who made the film discretely despite being banned from his craft at home and under the watchful eyes of authorities. Sony Classics’ Sundance title Land Ho! provides a comic twist to this week’s opening Specialties, as will Magnolia Pictures’ A Long Way Down.

boyhood-posterBoyhood
Director-writer: Richard Linklater
Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelei Linklater
Distributor: IFC Films

Richard Linklater’s groundbreaking film had ridden a long wave of buzz even before its sneak preview at the Sundance Film Festival and its debut in Berlin this year. Twelve years in the making, the drama centers on the life of a boy, Mason (played by Ellar Coltrane throughout), between ages 5 and 18. The film began in 2002 when Linklater teamed with Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette. Linklater also tapped his daughter Lorelei Linklater to play Mason’s sister. In Berlin, Linklater said they simply referred … Read More »

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The Best Lines About 2014′s Worst-Reviewed Films (So Far). Thanks, ‘Tammy!’

By and | Sunday July 6, 2014 @ 2:08pm PDT

The Best Lines About 2014′s Worst-Reviewed Films (So Far). Thanks, ‘Tammy!’Lost in a long and sleepy holiday weekend’s ennui, we couldn’t help ourselves: We’ve pulled together lines culled from the funniest/worst movie reviews so far this year, pulling out some jewels. Here’s what we came up with:

Tammy (Opened July 2, 27% Rotten Tomatoes Score)
Melissa McCarthy‘s film sees her once again working the schtick as an in-your-face femme, this time on the road with her just-as-crass granny (Susan Sarandon). Given that the film seems to be headed into a ditch after a weak open, one can’t help wondering whether the Bridesmaids thesp’s routine is aging fast.

“The good news is that Tammy is not a crappy remake of the 1957 Tammy movie with Debbie Reynolds that spawned three sequels and a TV comedy series. The bad news is that this one is much worse… It’s about as funny as a liver transplant.” — New York Observer’s Rex Reed, who already had a bone to pick with McCarthy last year. Read More »

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R.I.P. Paul Mazursky

By | Tuesday July 1, 2014 @ 12:03pm PDT

R.I.P. Paul MazurskyThe prolific Oscar-nominated screenwriter and director whose films include Harry And Tonto, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and Down And Out In Beverly Hills, died yesterday in Los Angeles of pulmonary cardiac arrest. Paul Mazursky was 84.

Born 1930 in Brooklyn as Irwin Mazursky, he was a graduate of Brooklyn College and made his cinema debut in Stanley Kubrick’s feature Fear And Desire.  When he wasn’t acting, Mazursky was a stand-up comic in New York and at the Gate of Horn in Chicago.  After befriending Pauls Sills and Barbara Harris, Marzursky appeared in the west coast company of Second City.  Writing gigs followed on The Danny Kaye Show among many others, before he co-wrote the pilot for The Monkees TV series, in which he had a cameo. In 1968, Mazursky made his screenwriting debut with the Peter Sellers comedy I Love You, Alice B. Toklas. The following year, he made his directorial debut with the breakout hit Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, which he also co-wrote. The comedy, which follows the extramarital exploits of two jaded California couples and starred Elliot Gould, Natalie Wood, Dyan Cannon and Robert Culp, earned four Oscar nominations: best original screenplay for Mazursky, supporting actor for Gould, supporting actress for Cannon, and best cinematography for DP Charles Lang. Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice embraced the sexual revolution of the late ’60s and started a trend for films that dealt with spouse-swapping and infidelity in interpersonal relationships. Read More »

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Roger Ebert’s Final Hollywood Premiere: Can A Movie About A Movie CRITIC Be Oscar Bound?

By | Friday June 27, 2014 @ 3:25pm PDT
Pete Hammond

Roger Ebert’s Final Hollywood Premiere: Can A Movie About A Movie CRITIC  Be Oscar Bound?Before the screening began at last night’s Hollywood premiere of director Steve James’ Roger Ebert documentary Life ItselfEbert’s remarkable wife Chaz shared something with the packed crowd of industry notables that her late husband told her as they were embarking on the shooting of the film. “Roger said, ‘Make sure Steve doesn’t make a movie I don’t want to see’,” she laughed. Mission accomplished, but in a cruel stroke of irony for the world’s most famous film critic, he didn’t live to see it completed.

Related: Sundance: Roger Ebert Docu Debut Draws Cheers & Tears

James, best known for his 1994 documentary Hoop Dreams, has made a tough, entertaining, unsentimental and enormously moving film that everyone should want to see. It’s not just about a"Life Itself" - Los Angeles Premiere blue-collar kid from Chicago, who turned into a Pulitzer Prize-winning movie critic. It’s mostly an unflinching and unapologetic account of a man determined to keep on keepin’ on after devastating cancer robbed him of his speech and ability to eat but not his mind, his love for movies or, most of all, his love for Chaz, his wife of 20 years who stood by him and kept him going long after others would have given up. “Roger lived his life out loud, even when he lost his physical voice,” she said. Of the movie, which is brutally honest about his illness and never looks away, my wife said, “It’s the greatest love story I have ever seen”. It is that too. Just before rolling the film, Chaz noted that she had an empty chair in the front row at the Arclight that said simply, ‘Reserved for Roger’ because “he told me I’ll always be in the front row cheering you on”.

Related: Hot Trailer: Roger Ebert Docu ‘Life Itself’

Magnolia will release the film next week, and though the Academy’s documentary branch often ignores movies about the movies, this one is irresistible. Wouldn’t it be ironic if a movie about a film critic who wrote books called I Hated Hated HATED This Movie and Your Movie Sucks (among many others more positive to the medium) were to win an Oscar? I spotted plenty of Academy voters in the audience last night, including Acad President Cheryl Boone Isaacs. Read More »

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Cannes Palme d’Or Winner ‘Winter Sleep’ Acquired By Adopt Films

By | Monday June 23, 2014 @ 8:46am PDT

Cannes Palme d’Or Winner ‘Winter Sleep’ Acquired By Adopt FilmsAdopt Films has acquired all U.S. rights to this year’s Cannes Film Festival Palme d’Or winner, Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Winter Sleep. The Turkish drama took the top prize despite its daunting 3-hour, 16-minute run time that even had jury president Jane Campion wondering if she’d need a bathroom break in the middle of the Palais premiere. “But it had such a beautiful rhythm and it just took me in,” Campion said at the post-awards press conference. “Actually I could have sat there for another two hours. It was all very Chekhovian. I could see myself in all of the characters.” Adopt plans a year-end 2014 U.S. release. Read More »

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LA Film Festival: Clint Eastwood’s ‘Jersey Boys’ Gets Closing Night Send-Off With Rousing Premiere

By | Friday June 20, 2014 @ 2:27am PDT
Pete Hammond

The Los Angeles Film Festival ended  Thursday night on a high note (a really high note, in fact) at LA Live with the premiere of Clint Eastwood‘s movie version of the smash Broadway jukebox musical, Jersey Boys which has been running nearly a decade — and with no end in sight. The film, which I thought was terrific but very different from what I saw on stage, will almost certainly goose the sales of the play. The conventional wisdom used to be that when a movie came out, the live show was toast. But in recent years Chicago, The Phantom Of The Opera, Mamma Mia!, and even Rock Of Ages have flourished on Broadway long after their film counterparts have come and gone. I expect no different from Jersey Boys; in this case there might even be more interest since both are really different animals telling the same story. And what a story it is. So far, critical reaction has been divided down the middle, but I guess it all depends on your life experience. Eastwood isn’t exactly known for doing musicals (and let’s not remember his acting role in 1970′s flop Broadway transfer Paint Your Wagon, where he sang “to the trees”). But he has a strong musical sense (having directed the Charlie Parker biopic, Bird and scored many of his own films as well as being a well-known jazz aficionado). This story of the rise to stardom of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons from the tough neighborhoods of Jersey has been given grit and … Read More »

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Jan Schuette Named New Dean Of AFI Conservatory

By | Tuesday June 17, 2014 @ 9:00am PDT

Jan Schuette Named New Dean Of AFI ConservatoryGerman director and producer Jan Schuette (Schütte) has been appointed Dean of the American Film Institute Conservatory, succeeding Robert Mandel who exited in December after nine years at the post. Schuette most recently served as Director of the German Film and Television Academy in Berlin, a position he assumed in 2010. He previously taught at Harvard and Dartmouth in addition to Filmakademie Baden-Württemberg, where he created the master class program Atelier Ludwigsburg Paris.

Schuette made his feature debut with 1987′s Drachenfutter, which won the Venice Film Festival’s UNESCO Award and won him numerous critical awards. He won Best Director at the German Film Awards for 1990′s Winckelmanns Reisen. He’s served on festival juries including Cinéfondation Jury at the Cannes Film Festival and the International Drama Jury at the Sundance Film Festival and is a member of Akademie der Künste Berlin Brandenburg and the European Film Academy.

“The AFI Conservatory was born nearly 50 years ago – inspired by the European conservatory model,” said Bob Gazzale, AFI President and CEO. “Today it remains unique in that we promise MFA candidates that they will make at least four films in two years. And so we searched the world for an academic leader who has also made movies – who has lived it. We are proud to say we found that person in Jan Schuette and look forward to his tenure beginning in the fall.”

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Specialty Box Office Preview: ‘The Rover’, ‘Hellion’, ‘Ivory Tower’, ‘A Coffee In Berlin’, ‘Violette’, ‘I Am I’

By | Thursday June 12, 2014 @ 4:59pm PDT

boxoffice-specialty__111212022432-200x150 (1)Coming on the heels of last weekend’s robust opening of Obvious Child, A24 is opening the first Cannes 2014 title The Rover, boasting an A-list cast including Guy Pearce, Robert Pattinson and Scoot McNairy. Sundance Selects will bow the Aaron Paul-Juliette Lewis starrer Hellion exclusively in New York, while Music Box will also take A Coffee In Berlin to NYC for its initial launch. Samuel Goldwyn Films is partnering with Participant for Sundance doc Ivory Tower which asks whether higher education is worth the trillions in debt in the U.S. Adopt Films is countering this weekend’s 22 Jump Street and How To Train Your Dragon 2 studio releases with French film Violette while Gravitas Ventures opens I Am I.

The RoverThe Rover
Director-writer: David Michôd
Writer: Joel Edgerton,
Cast: Guy Pearce, Robert Pattinson, Scoot McNairy, David Field, Anthony Hayes, Gillian Jones
Distributor: A24

Producer Liz Watts produced filmmaker David Michôd’s Animal Kingdom through her company Porchlight Films and was lured to the current project after reading the screenplay for The Rover. The crime drama takes place 10 years after a global economic collapse in which a hardened ex-soldier tracks down the men who stole his only possession, traveling through the lawless Australian outback and taking a damaged young man as his accomplice. “I was keen to work with David again,” said Watts. “As a director and collaborator he is brilliant, but I also loved his screenplay for The Rover. I read it around the time we were traveling for Animal Kingdom’s release in January 2010.” Though the film is Australian in tone it has an international cast and backing. David Linde’s Lava Bear Films also produced as did FilmNation during the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. “By the shoot we’d pre-sold around 75% of international territories,” said Watts. “A24 came on board in May 2013 for domestic.” Watts said that critically important was shooting in Australia meant the filmmakers were able to seek significant investment through Screen Australia, together with the Producer’s Offset, and with state bodies South Australian Film Corporation (for shooting in South Australia) and Screen NSW (for post-production in Sydney). Read More »

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CAA Signs Hot Cannes Helmer Jonas Alexander Arnby

By | Thursday June 12, 2014 @ 3:20pm PDT
Mike Fleming

dreamaEXCLUSIVE: In a competitive situation, CAA has signed Danish helmer Jonas Alexander Arnby, a commercials director whose art house horror film When Animals Dream created a stir at Critics Week at the Cannes Film Festival. The film was acquired by Radius-TWC for distribution.

arnbThe film is about a teen girl from a fishing village in Denmark whose sexual awakening manifests itself as she becomes a blood-hungry werewolf. The film drew comparisons to Let The Right One In and it was Arnby’s directorial debut.

Here is the film’s trailer:

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Weinstein Co Sets March 2015 Release For Cannes Pickup ‘The Coup’, Moves ‘Paddington’ To Christmas Day

By | Tuesday June 10, 2014 @ 2:35pm PDT

the-weinstein-company-logo-1__140502172505-275x153The Weinstein Company made one of the biggest purchase of last month’s Cannes Film Festival when it scooped up The Coup, the John Erick Dowdle and Drew Dowdle international thriller that stars Owen Wilson, Pierce Brosnan and Lake Bell. The deal for U.S. distribution rights topped a bidding battle that topped out at $5 million. Now that pic has a release date: March 6, 2015. The plot centers on an American family that relocates to Southeast Asia, only to find themselves in the middle of a violent coup. They struggle to find an escape route because the new parties in control are executing foreigners as quickly as they can round them up. Bold Films produced, and Drew Dowdle, Michel Litvak and David Lancaster produced.

TWC today also shifted dates for a couple of its pics already on its schedule. It has moved its Paddington to a Christmas Day 2014 release after previously slotting it for December 12. It also has pushed back Underdogs, its animated comedy from Juan Jose Campanella, from August 27, 2014 to January 16, 2015.

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Lionsgate Acquires North American, UK Distribution Rights To Nicholas Sparks’ Novel Adaptation ‘The Choice’

By | Tuesday June 10, 2014 @ 11:42am PDT
Mike Fleming

sparkyEXCLUSIVE: Lionsgate has acquired North American and UK distribution rights to The Choice, an adaptation of the 2007 Nicholas Sparks novel that has a script by Bryan Sipe, with Sparks, Theresa Park and Peter Safran producing. Production begins in the fall. The deal, which began percolating during the Cannes Film Festival market, is similar in construct to the deal that Paramount made for Story Of Your Life, and the $12 million deal The Weinstein Company made on The Lion. This is for less money, but Lionsgate basically has bought a fully developed film. It is the first time that Sparks has gone this route; he usually auctions his new fiction and gets millions in guaranteed fees. He wanted instead to incubate the project before shopping it, and take part as an investor in the film.

Related:
Cannes: ‘Lion’ To Roar In $12 Million TWC Deal After Auction
Cannes: Paramount Confirms ‘Story Of Your Life’ Acquisition

The Choice tells the story of a long love affair that begins when Travis Parker and Gabby Holland first met as neighbors in a small coastal town and end up pursuing a relationship that neither could have foreseen. It spans a decade and traces the evolution of a love affair that is ultimately tested by life’s most defining events. Sparks’ The Best Of Me and The Longest Ride are currently in production. This is Lionsgate’s first project with the author, who with Park formed Nicholas Sparks Productions and recently acquired rights to make a movie on the life of Chicago Bears running back Gale Sayers. Read More »

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Specialty B.O. Preview: ‘The Sacrament’, ‘The Case Against 8′, ‘Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon’, ‘Obvious Child’, More

boxoffice-specialty__111212022432-200x150 (1)The Edge Of Tomorrow and The Fault In Our Stars may reign supreme among new theatrical offerings this weekend, but a crowded pack of specialty newcomers will nip at their heels including documentaries, thrillers and more. Ti West’s The Sacrament will open, following up on 2011 feature The Innkeepers, while A24 bows its Sundance feature Obvious Child, Drafthouse Films opens Borgman and FilmBuff gets theatrical with Burt’s Buzz. Radius-TWC hopes to repeat its box office and award-winning triumph 20 Feet From Stardom with docu Supermensch: The Legend Of Shep Gordon. HBO Documentary will open its Sundance winner The Case Against 8 in theaters ahead of its small-screen debut later this month. Emerging Pictures is launching the weekend’s foreign-language newcomer Dormant Beauty and Well Go USA and MPI will bow Rigor Mortis and Willow Creek in limited runs beginning tomorrow.

The SacramentThe Sacrament
Director-writer: Ti West
Cast: Joe Swanberg, AJ Bowen, Kentucker Audley, Amy Seimetz, Kate Lyn Sheil, Gene Jones, Shawn Parsons, Donna Biscoe
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures

Filmmaker Ti West was looking to do something different from his previous feature, The Innkeepers, which opened in 2011. The thriller follows a news team in pursuit of a man as he travels to an undisclosed location to find his missing sister. Upon entering Eden Parish and meeting the community’s leader, it becomes apparent to the newcomers that things are not quite as they appear. “I wanted to something much more confronting and horrific,” said West, speaking from New Mexico where he’s working on his next project, the Western A Valley Of Violence. “I wanted to use a real event as the framework of the story and media brand.” The real event West is referring to is Jonestown, the infamous People’s Temple in Guyana headed by Jim Jones in which more than 900 people committed mass suicide in 1978. “I think it’s misunderstood. People just think about the mass [deaths] at People’s Temple,” said West. “[But] I think the circumstances are relevant today, but we’re desensitized to the violence because of the media.” West put together financing quickly and went right to location in Georgia. “I got the movie made over a treatment really,” said West. “I wrote the script with people in mind and wrote it to their strengths. At the end of the day we didn’t do much improvisation, but we were making a movie that wasn’t easy.” West said the production had a lot of “moving parts” so collaboration on the 18-day shoot was prohibitive “[Producer Eli Roth] gave me final cut and the final decision on casting,” added West. The Sacrament premiered at Venice and Toronto and is the fifth title he’s released via Magnolia. “It’s cool to have a company I get along with very well,” he said. “I get the feeling sometimes that we’re in this together which is great to have as an independent filmmaker.” The company will open Sacrament at Cinema Village in New York and The Carlton in Toronto. It will head to Charlotte, NC on June 12 with cities including LA, Portland, OR, Denver, Atlanta and Cambridge, MA opening June 13, with additional markets added throughout the month. Read More »

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Radius-TWC Acquires Cannes Critics Week Pic ‘It Follows’

By | Tuesday June 3, 2014 @ 8:17am PDT

ItFollowsRadius-TWC has picked up its second pic from this year’s Cannes Film Festival Critics Week sidebar, acquiring U.S. rights to the David Robert Mitchell horror movie It Follows. The deal follows the Weinstein Company label’s buy of fellow Critics Week selection When Animals Dream this year; it picked up Blue Ruin at Cannes the year before. A first-quarter 2015 release is planned for It Follows, which centers on a teenager (Maika Monroe) who finds herself plagued by disturbing visions and the inescapable sense that something is following her after she has a strange sexual encounter. Keir Gilchrist, Daniel Zovatto, Jake Weary, Olivia Luccardi and Lili Sepe star. Animal Kingdom and Northern Lights financed the pic, and Radius-TWC principals Tom Quinn and Jason Janego negotiated the deal with Cinetic in conjunction with Jen Dana on behalf of the filmmakers. Mitchell, who also wrote and directed 2010′s The Myth Of The American Sleepover, produced with Rebecca Green, Laura D. Smith, David Kaplan and Erik Rommesmo.

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Film Financier Worldview Shakeup: CEO Christopher Woodrow Exits Abruptly

By | Monday June 2, 2014 @ 2:18pm PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: A major shakeup has gone down at Worldview Entertainment, and CEO Christopher Woodrow has exited abruptly amidst allegations of personal misconduct. I don’t have much more than that at this moment, but COO Molly Conners has taken the reins as acting CEO of the New York-based financing worldand production company. She and recently appointed Motion Picture Group president Clifford Werber will continue to oversee Worldview films that are in production and release, as well as future films. Those changes were made with the support of lead investors and the board and management team at Worldview.

This is a shocker. With Woodrow at its helm, Worldview has quickly emerged as an up and coming backer of taste-maker fare, and they were very visible and busy at the Cannes Film Festival. The company just made a five-year co-fi deal with The Weinstein Company, and the projects Worldview is involved in are major. They include the Daniel Espinosa-directed Child 44, the Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu-directed Birdman, Warren Beatty’s Howard Hughes movie, the Leonardo DiCaprio-starrer The Revenant, the Helen Mirren-starrer The Woman In Gold, and David Gordon Green’s Manglehorn.

It sounds like the company plans to pick the pace right up, but there will clearly be more to this story and we’ll reveal it when the details become evident.

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Deadline’s Best Film Stories Of The Week

Catch up Marvel’s Ant-Man director saga and more from the week in movie news:

edgarwright‘Ant-Man’ / Edgar Wright Lessons: Kevin Feige’s Vision Rules Marvel; Time To Get Excited About ‘Kolchak: The Night Stalker’?
By Mike Fleming Jr.
A couple of things to consider in the divorce between Edgar Wright and Marvel over Ant-Man. In my mind, Wright’s surprise exit Friday over creative differences shows that while Marvel certainly will try to tap strong directors for its superhero properties, the power at that studio clearly resides with one person, Kevin Feige.

Will Risky ‘Ant-Man’ Be Marvel’s Waterloo Or Greatest Triumph?
By Mike Fleming Jr.
adam mckayMarvel and the reps of Adam McKay will spend the weekend trying to make a deal for the Talladega Nights helmer to replace Edgar Wright as the director of Ant-Man. McKay, the former Saturday Night Live writer who grew up on that show with Will Ferrell and moved with him to feature films, has become an accomplished director of comedies (Step Brothers is my favorite), but this seems to be a risky move (reports have him already deciding this is not for him).

Relativity Acquires ‘Fearless’ For Film On Navy SEAL Team Six Hero Adam Brown
By Mike Fleming Jr.
EXCLUSIVE: In competitive bidding, Relativity has acquired Fearless, based on the Eric Blehm bestselling book on SEAL Team Six operative Adam Brown. Brown battled personal demons, including drug addiction and jail time, to fulfill his childhood dream of becoming a Navy SEAL.

The_Amazing_Spider-Man_2_(film)_poster_001Sony Imageworks’ Flight To Vancouver Latest Blow In VFX Subsidies Battle
By Jen Yamato
Sony Pictures Imageworks announced late Thursday that its headquarters will relocate to Vancouver, leaving the fate of its 270 Culver City VFX workers in question. Read More »

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Oscars: How Cannes May Have More Impact Than Ever On The 2014 Race

Pete Hammond

As my French fog lifts in the wake of my return from the Cannes Film Festival it’s a good time to look at how it might havethe-academy-oscars-new-logo-1 impacted the 2014 Oscar race as the calendar turns to June and we have the first big benchmark out of the way. That’s not to say that Cannes is a huge indicator of where this thing will be come Fall when it really heats up, but this is one of the better years I think in terms of Cannes and potential for its ultimate impact on the awards season. Some years are better than others. You might recall in 2011 three films in the official Cannes selection, The Tree Of Life, Midnight In Paris and The Artist all went on to Best Picture nominations with the latter even winning. It’s never too early to speculate.

Related: DeadlineNow: Early Frontrunners In The Oscar Race (Video)

sony-pictures-classics-logoSony Pictures Classics (which had Midnight In Paris)  certainly seems to think 2014 is going to similarly big so they put out a press release earlier this week touting their triumph on the Cote d’Azur . They held the hot hand this year with a flurry of titles they brought and bought to Croisette.  They come out of Cannes very strong with contenders of various stripes across several categories including Best Picture for Foxcatcher and Mr. Turner (with an outside shot for Directors Fortnight entry Whiplash which actually … Read More »

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Global Showbiz Briefs: Daniel Emmerson Joins Michael Fassbender’s DMC Film; ‘Remember’ Sells To Dozen-Plus Territories; More

Daniel Emmerson Joins Michael Fassbender’s Production Company
Producer Daniel Emmerson has joined Michael Fassbender and Conor McCaughan’s London-based production outfit DMC Film. The company is in postproduction on Slow West, the feature debut of director John Maclean, who won the 2012 BAFTA for Best Short Film for Pitch Black Heist. Fassbender stars in Slow West, which is backed by Film4 in co-production with See Saw Films. Other DMC projects include Assassin’s Creed with Ubisoft and New Regency, and due to start shooting in 2015, as well as the BBC Films backed Garagistas written by James Graham. Emmerson brings with him a slate of projects and relationships with emerging talent including Fagin’s Kitchen, which is being co-developed with Film4 and will be directed by Kibwe Tavares and written by Daniel Kaluuya. Read More »

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