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‘Mice’ Roar More: James Franco, Chris O’Dowd & Co. Will Get ‘NT Live’ Broadcasts

‘Mice’ Roar More: James Franco, Chris O’Dowd & Co. Will Get ‘NT Live’ BroadcastsProducer David Binder, juggling the smash success of two star-driven Broadway revivals — Hedwig And The Angry Inch and Of Mice And Men — added another arrow to his quiver of successful producing tips this morning by announcing a deal has been struck making the Steinbeck drama, starring James Franco, Chris O’Dowd, Leighton Meester and Jim Norton, the first Broadway show to be filmed for telecast under the wing of the UK’s National Theatre Live.

The deal was made in a flurry of activity over the last several days, Wayne Wolfe, a spokesman for the show, told Deadline, including securing the OKs of Broadway’s particularly protective unions. Read More »

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Woody Allen’s ‘Bullets Over Broadway’ Closing Next Month

By | Tuesday July 22, 2014 @ 8:10pm PDT

Woody Allen’s ‘Bullets Over Broadway’ Closing Next MonthUPDATE: Bullets Over Broadway will close at almost a complete loss of its $15 million-plus capitalization. Here’s the second announcement in a week about a movie-to-Main Stem musical closing. Six days after news surfaced that Rocky The Musical was KO’d comes word that Bullets Over Broadway will go dark August 24. The show, based on Woody Allen’s 1994 film comedy about an idealistic playwright who gets entangled with gangsters in order to see his high-minded play produced on Broadway, will lose most, if not all, of its $15-million-plus capitalization. It also represents the second costly demise, after Big Fish, of a musical from last season that arrived with high expectations based not only on its film pedigree but on the previous record of director-choregrapher Susan Stroman (Contact; The Producers).

Screen Shot 2014-07-22 at 11.05.34 PMBut the great-looking, slickly produced, high-energy tuner failed to garner the necessary rave reviews and theatergoer buzz despite a name star (Zach Braff) and six Tony nominations. Last week, an almost universally upbeat one on Broadway, Bullets took in $686,693, equal to just 45 percent of its gross potential, at the St. James Theatre box office. That probably didn’t cover its weekly operating expenses.

Related: Hugh Jackman Hippity-Hops Through CBS’ Ruthlessly Upbeat All-Star Tony Show

The show will have played 156 performances since opening April 10 after 33 previews. In addition to Braff, it starred Helene Yorke as the talent-free girlfriend of … Read More »

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Broadway Box Office: Summer Heats Up As ‘Lion’ Hits $2.4M, ‘Mice’ Breaks House Record At $929,000

By | Monday July 21, 2014 @ 12:47pm PDT

Broadway Box Office: Summer Heats Up As ‘Lion’ Hits $2.4M, ‘Mice’ Breaks House Record At $929,000Disney’s inexhaustible Lion King continued to roar last week, ringing up $2.43 million in ticket sales at the 1,700-seat Minskoff Theatre as Broadway jumped $2.23 million over the week before. Total receipts were $27,867, 272 for 29 shows for the week ending Sunday, as the Street bid farewell to Holler If Ya Hear Me and The Cripple Of Inishmaan. Both of those shows benefited from theatergoers knowing it was their final chance before bye-bye, translating into increases of $112,037 for Holler and $144,081 for Daniel Radcliffe’s Cripple, per figures released by the Broadway League trade group.

"What If" Screening - 2014 New York Film Critics SeriesAs reported earlier, several shows broke house records: At the Longacre, James Franco and Chris O’Dowd whipped Of Mice And Men up to $929,343, an increase of $66,481 over the week before. Hedwig And The Angry Inch  broke the Belasco house record for the fifth time, ringing up $1,088,660 in sales, a slight increase over the week before. And Beautiful: The Carole King Musical jumped $46,627 to $1,300,153 at the Sondheim.

Only one show posted a decline: If/Then, the Idina Menzel starrer, was off $27,115, to $773,533, about 60% of its gross potential at the Richard Rodgers and not a great sign for the rest of the summer. Longterm survivor Phantom Of The Opera was up an impressive $137,410 to $1,114,417 at the Majestic; Kinky Boots kicked up … Read More »

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The ‘Mice’ That Roared: Franco, O’Dowd, Meester Sets Broadway House Record; ‘Beautiful’ Too

By | Monday July 21, 2014 @ 8:51am PDT

The ‘Mice’ That Roared: Franco, O’Dowd, Meester Sets Broadway House Record; ‘Beautiful’ TooUPDATE: Beautiful: The Carole King Musical grossed $1.3 million, breaking the house record at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre for the 12th time in 36 weeks of performances.

Proving their chops as Broadway draws, James Franco, Chris O’Dowd, Leighton Meester and Jim Norton set a second house record last week as their run in the revival of John Steinbeck’s Of Mice And Men comes to a close. The show grossed $929,888 for the week ending July 20, breaking its previous record of $897,851.00 for the week ending April 27. The show, which opened on April 16 at the Longacre Theatre and recouped its $3.8 million capitalization after 12 weeks, ends its limited run this Sunday.

Screen Shot 2014-07-21 at 11.08.51 AMThe success of Mice, staged by Anna D. Shapiro, underscores the value of smart marketing, stalwart producing and, essentially, great word-of-mouth, all of which urged the show — hardly your typical breezy summer fare — to must-see status. The producers are David Binder, Kate Lear, Darren Bagert, Adam Zotovich, Latitude Link/Piedmont Productions, Raise the Roof, Paula Marie Black, Marc Turtletaub, Ruth Hendel/Barbara Whitman, Marianne Mills/Jayne Baron Sherman, Martin Massman, Judy Kent/Wendy Knudsen, Kevin Niu, Michael Watt and The Shubert Organization. 101 Productions, Ltd are the executive producers.

More Broadway box office news will come this afternoon.

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Bert Berns, The Rock Phenom You Never Heard Of, Finally Gets His Due

By | Sunday July 20, 2014 @ 6:20pm PDT

Bert Berns, The Rock Phenom You Never Heard Of, Finally Gets His DueJukebox musicals are the guilty pleasures of Broadway and, ever more frequently, off-Broadway, offering well-heeled patrons the joys of nostalgia and the reassuring sense that the songs we grew up on were classics worthy of revisiting. How else to account for the extraordinary popularity of Jersey Boys, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Motown: The Musical, The Million Dollar Quartet, Smokey Joe’s Cafe, Mamma Mia! and Rock Of Ages (not to metion the good, if less successful Holler If Ya Hear Me and A Night With Janis Joplin)? Piece Of My Heart: The Bert Berns Story, which opened Sunday night on 42nd Street, is a bargain-basement jukebox musical as entertaining as the best of those shows.

But it’s also on an evangelical mission: To make the case that Bert Berns has a rightful place in the pantheon of American rock-music writing legends that includes Goffin and King, Leiber and Stoller, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Bacharach and David, Mann and Weil, and Barry and Greenwich.

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Shubert CEO Phil Smith Says B’way Biggie Will Buy Off-Broadway `Mall’

By | Saturday July 19, 2014 @ 10:15am PDT

Shubert CEO Phil Smith Says B’way Biggie Will Buy Off-Broadway `Mall’EXCLUSIVE: Shubert Organization chairman and CEO Philip J. Smith confirmed the deal by Broadway’s biggest landlord to purchase New World Stages, an off-Broadway complex on West 50th Street just outside the Broadway theater district. ”I would say, ‘Yes, it it’s going to happen,’ ” Smith told Deadline.com when asked about a report in the New York Times speculating on the sale. “I can’t say when, but it will happen.” He declined to say how much Shubert would pay for New World.

163112349Comprising five grotto houses ranging in size from 199 to 499 seats, New World is owned by Dutch entertainment mogul Joop van den Ende’s Stage Entertainment, currently lead producer of the musical Rocky, which is set to close in August at the Shubert-owned Winter Garden Theatre. Van den Ende’s involvement in New Workd goes back to a co-production arrangement his former company, Endemol, had with New York-based Dodger Theatricals. It was the Dodgers who took over the former discount-movie theaters after they went out of business in 2001. The Dodgers spent $23 million converting the space into a “theater mall” with a total of more than 1,900 seats, three bars and more restroom space than many Broadway theaters. Read More »

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Hot Video: First Look At ‘Shakespeare In Love’ On Stage In London

By | Friday July 18, 2014 @ 1:21pm PDT

Hot Video: First Look At ‘Shakespeare In Love’ On Stage In LondonThe Oscar-winning film has been adapted for the stage by Lee Hall (Billy Elliot) from the screenplay by Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard. A co-production of Disney and Sonia Friedman Productions, the show is currently previewing at London’s Noel Coward Theatre and opening on July 23. The cast of 28 and a dog is directed by Declan Donnellan and the romantic comedy has been designed by Nick Ormerod. Look for a Broadway transfer in the not-too-distant future.

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New York Minute: Post-’Holler’ Palace Books ‘Paris’; Rte. 57 Revisited; James Franco Directs

By | Thursday July 17, 2014 @ 2:20pm PDT

New York Minute: Post-’Holler’ Palace Books ‘Paris’; Rte. 57 Revisited; James Franco DirectsIt didn’t take long for the Nederlander Organization to fill the gap at the Palace Theatre left by the soon-to-depart Holler If Ya Hear Me. As Deadline reported previously, the producers of An American In Paris — the musical with old Gershwin songs and new everything else, including staging and dances by superstar choreographer Christopher Wheeldon and a book by Craig Lucas (Prelude To  Kiss) — were hoping to firm up a transfer even before the show opens in the City of Light in November.

With many of Broadway’s premiere houses locked in with long-running shows, it’s a seller’s market and most theaters have prospective tenants lined up three-deep, circling weaker shows and waiting to pounce. So while the Shuberts pick and choose the next tenant for the Winter Garden, where Rocky will soon close up shop (a possible plus for Harvey Weinstein, who is looking for Finding Neverland possibly to land there after its upcoming tryout at the American Repertory Theatre in Cambridge, MA) and Jason Robert Brown’s Honeymoon In Vegas booked into the Nederlander’s Brooks Atkinson, the inventory is fast shrinking. Now the ghost-filled 1,700-seat Palace, jointly owned by Nederlander and Stewart F. Lane, is booked as well. Read More »

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R.I.P. Elaine Stritch, Tough-Broad Muse Of Sondheim, Noel Coward And Survivors Everywhere

R.I.P. Elaine Stritch, Tough-Broad Muse Of Sondheim, Noel Coward And Survivors EverywhereUPDATED with more information throughout: The Broadway star who turned Stephen Sondheim’s song of survival “I’m Still Here” into a personal anthem of triumph over booze, diabetes, unfaithful lovers, indifferent producers, demanding directors, fawning fans and long stretches of unemployment before achieving the status of Living Legend in her later decades, died Thursday in Birmingham, MI, the Detroit suburb to which she decamped a year ago after living the fabulous life for years at Madison Avenue’s Hotel Carlyle. She was 89. Broadway dimmed its lights for one minute on Friday at 7:45 PM in tribute.

"Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me" New York ScreeningStritch may have found the widest audience of her storied career playing Alec Baldwin’s sharp-tongued mother on the NBC comedy 30 Rock. She was also a sometime favorite of Woody Allen, having appeared in the films Small Time Crooks and September.

But Stritch was first and foremost a creature of the stage, playing large roles and small and always, essentially, Elaine Stritch. Slight and charismatic, she proffered a mezzo soprano that, in youth, had a hungering quality one can hear in “I Never Know When,” from 1958′s Goldilocks – an otherwise forgotten musical by Jean and Walter Kerr, with songs by Leroy Anderson, Joan Ford and the Kerrs — in which Stritch starred with Don Ameche and Russell Nype. Later, that voice would become as distinctive as Tom Waits’, invariably described as sandpaper soaked in whisky or some variation of the two. Still, it never lost that sense of urgency, and the two qualities combined to distinguished Stritch from the other Broadway divas of an era long enough to encompass Ethel Merman, Mary Martin, Carol Channing, Angela Lansbury and Bernadette Peters. Read More »

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Broadway Hands Dutch Mogul Joop Van Den Ende Latest K.O. As ‘Rocky’ Goes Down For The Count

By | Tuesday July 15, 2014 @ 3:31pm PDT

Broadway Hands Dutch Mogul Joop Van Den Ende Latest K.O. As ‘Rocky’ Goes Down For The Count

Dutch entertainment mogul Joop van den Ende is one of Europe’s savviest producers of movies, TV and legit, but he just can’t catch a break on Broadway. His latest venture, the musical adaptation of Rocky, was a hit on the Continent — it’s still selling out in Hamburg — but the tuner will shutter August 17 at the Winter Garden Theatre at a complete loss of its estimated $16 million-plus capitalization. Van den Ende will share the pain with a four-star roster of partners including Rocky himself, Sylvester Stallone, MGM, the two leading Broadway landlords, the Shubert Organization (which owns the Winter Garden) and the Nederlander Organization, along with a host of independent producers.

Rocky began previews February 13 and opened a month later to mostly critical yawns that tamped the box office despite some enthusiastic patrons getting in on highly discounted tickets. The show offered a certified coup de theatre from set designer Christopher Barreca in the final scene, which called for the folks in the front rows of the orchestra to move to stageside bleachers, offering a simulacrum of a live boxing event. The boxing ring in which Andy Karl’s Rocky Balboa fought Terence Archie’s Apollo Creed was drawn out on risers directly into the house, a knockout move. Strategic miking and custom-made props — including soft gloves that allowed the actors to actually pummel one another — enhanced the illusion. Read More »

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Broadway Box Office: Slow But Steady, ‘Mice’, ‘Cripple’ Leap $100K-plus

By | Tuesday July 15, 2014 @ 12:00pm PDT

Broadway Box Office: Slow But Steady, ‘Mice’, ‘Cripple’ Leap $100K-plusUPDATE: CORRECTED FIGURES The Broadway League released corrected figures for Cabaret that changed the weekly totals. Correct figures  are: Week 7 of the Broadway season held fairly steady over the previous week, showing a gain of $517,224 over the week before to a total take of $25,634,839, according to figures released by the trade group the Broadway League

More than half the uptick came from increases for two star-driven dramas. Of Mice And Men, featuring James Franco and  Chris O’Dowd in the John Steinbeck revival, took in $862,862, an increase of $107,506 over the week before at the Longacre  Theatre, with nearly every one of its 1,073 seats filled for all eight performances. Martin McDonagh’s The Cripple Of Inishmaan, at the 1,073-seat Cort, was up $129,241 to $596,630. That’s 61% of its $970,200 gross potential; the show played to 85 percent of capacity.

Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder, AWalter Kerr TheatreTony best musical winner A Gentleman’s Guide To Love & Murder gained again, by $14,841, to $901,681 and played to full houses. Also at or near SRO: Aladdin, Beautiful: The Carole King Musical, Hedwig And The Angry Inch, Lady Day At Emerson’s Bar & Grill, Matilda, Newsies, The Book of Mormon, The Lion King (which advanced again, to a Street-topping tally of $2,151,409), and Wicked.

Total season-to-date gross was $196,147,592, up 17.7% from the same week last season. Priciest average ducat was Book Of Mormon ($185.25), followed by Lion King ($160.74) Beautiful ($151.87)  and Hedwig ($148.66).

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Joely Richardson Will Slip Into Emily Dickinson’s Shoes in ‘Belle Of Amherst’ Reprise

By | Tuesday July 15, 2014 @ 11:29am PDT

Joely Richardson Will Slip Into Emily Dickinson’s Shoes in ‘Belle Of Amherst’ RepriseJoely Richardson, who’s staked out number of stage appearances since the end of her co-starring gig on Nip/Tuck, will play 19th-century American poet Emily Dickinson this fall in an off-Broadway revival of The Belle Of Amherst.

William Luce’s 1976 work was written for Julie Harris, who took home her fifth Tony 3269942Award for the solo show, in which she played Emily and 14 other roles. The show was broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service, and Harris toured it extensively for years. Director of the revival, which is set to begin performances on October 7th and open on the 19th at the Westside Theatre, is Steve Cosson, who runs The Civilians troupe.

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Ka-Ching! Starry, High-Priced London ‘Skylight’, Broadway ‘Hedwig’ Recoup Quickly

By | Tuesday July 15, 2014 @ 10:20am PDT

Ka-Ching! Starry, High-Priced London ‘Skylight’, Broadway ‘Hedwig’ Recoup QuicklyUPDATE, 10:20 AM: The Stage reports London ticket prices have tripled in a decade.  “The West End’s most expensive tickets have reached a new high of £152.25 ($261.23) after The Book Of Mormon increased its premium seat prices by 20% from last year’s £127,” according to a an annual survey conducted by the UK industry periodical whose results were released in June. “This is more than triple the amount it cost to buy a top-price seat in the West End only 10 years ago, when a record high was reached with a £49 ticket to see The Producers in 2004. Over the same period, house prices in London have increased by around 90%.”

Star power, great reviews and premium tickets worked some fast magic on both sides of the Atlantic this week as the producers of two of the hottest shows in recent seasons announced recoupment.

David Binder, the lead producer of Hedwig And The Angry Inch — the wild rock musical starring Neil Patrick Harris that in June won four Tony Awards, including best revival of a musical — said the show recouped as of last Sunday after 15 weeks (preview performances began on March 29). Harris, also a Tony winner, will be replaced beginning August 20 by Book Of Mormon and Girls star Andrew Rannells. According to the show’s documents, it was capitalized at $5 million.
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Tupac Shakur Musical ‘Holler If Ya Hear Me’ Gets Broadway’s Cold Shoulder

By | Monday July 14, 2014 @ 6:55pm PDT

Tupac Shakur Musical ‘Holler If Ya Hear Me’ Gets Broadway’s Cold ShoulderA rare, not to say quixotic, attempt to bring rap music into the Broadway mainstream, Holler If Ya Hear Me will close Sunday at the Palace Theatre after 17 previews and 38 regular performances. Embedding the music of murdered poet and rapper Tupac Shakur into a tale of struggle to find dignity on mean streets, Holler featured a strong ensemble cast led by what, under happier circumstances, would have been a star-making performance by hip-hop poet and rapper Saul Williams.

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 9.19.40 PMThe show was staged by Kenny Leon, who had just had a triumph directing a Broadway revival of A Raisin in The Sun starring Denzel Washington. Capitalized at about $8 million, the show lost money every week. Last week it took in just $154,948, or 17% of its gross potential, while playing to houses that were less than half-full in a legendary theater whose seating capacity already had been reduced by hundreds of seats for the show.

The musical, which opened in June, features over 20 Shakur songs, including the title number, ”California Love,” “I Get Around,” “Thugz Mansion,” “Keep Ya Head Up,” “Dear Mama,” “Me Against the World,” “Unconditional Love” and “Hail Mary.” Time magazine’s Richard Zoglin called the show “a bold effort to open up Broadway to a new musical idiom, without diluting it or reducing it to a cartoon. The show hollers, and you … Read More »

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Second Stage Nails Down ‘American Psycho’ Musical U.S. Premiere

By | Monday July 14, 2014 @ 10:00am PDT

Second Stage Nails Down ‘American Psycho’ Musical U.S. PremiereOff-Broadway powerhouse Second Stage will present the U.S. premiere of the much praised (and much debated) American Psycho, the musical adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’ 1991 novel (and 2000 Christian Bale-starring film) about excess, murder and flashing the right labels. The show — with music by Duncan Sheik, book by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, staging by Rupert Goold and a starring performance by Matt “Dr. Who” Smith – opened last December at London’s Almeida Theatre and was considered a shoo-in for Broadway next season. It still may be.

"Lost River" Premiere - The 67th Annual Cannes Film FestivalFor now, however, the show will begin performances in February 2015 and open in March at Second Stage’s West 43rd Street home base. It will be mounted in association with Act 4 Entertainment by special arrangement with Edward R. Pressman (who produced the film). Act 4 is a Los Angeles-based film and new media development company founded by David Johnson and committed to projects that “motivate and inspire audiences across the world toward social action.”

That’s a challenge for the Ellis novel, which prompted furious protests from feminist and human rights groups in reaction to its explicit, play-by-play depiction of the brutal torture and murder of women at the hands of protagonist Patrick Bateman, which the book’s defenders insisted was satire of a society gone mad with material obsession and moral vacuity. The musical has inspired almost inevitable comparisons to Sweeney Todd. Read More »

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Mike Nichols: It Took Me 50 Years To Figure Out That ‘The Graduate’ Is ‘Phedre’

By | Friday July 11, 2014 @ 7:42pm PDT

Mike Nichols: It Took Me 50 Years To Figure Out That ‘The Graduate’ Is ‘Phedre’Broadway‘s John Golden Theatre was SRO Friday evening with invited guests and fans who’d scored tickets through a lottery to hear directors Mike Nichols and Jack O’Brien talk movies — specifically Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? (1966) and The Graduate (1967), Nichols’ freshman and sophomore efforts following an extraordinary run of Broadway hits that included Neil Simon’s Barefoot In The Park and The Odd Couple. The first film earned him an Oscar nomination for best director; with the second film, he took home the statuette.

Screen Shot 2014-07-11 at 10.23.49 PMThe conversation, which was being filmed for HBO, began a day earlier, in private, and covered his years as half of the comedy team of Nichols and May (whose 306-performance Broadway run beginning in October 1960 had taken place in this same theater) and his collaborations with Simon and others. And it will pick up again in private on Monday, dealing with his years working both sides of the continent. But Friday night, the subject was filmmaking, a career Nichols practically fell into by accident.

Related: `Master Class’ Helmer Mike Nichols Talks Shop for HBO

“Who the hell are you, and how did you know you could do a film?” O’Brien asked, only half-kiddingly after a brief introduction. O’Brien — himself one of the theater’s most intelligent and crystalline directors (with Nichols he shares a special affinity for the work of Tom Stoppard) — explained that after recently publishing his autobiography, he’d encouraged Nichols to do the same. Out of Nichols’ demurral came the idea of filming the conversations; the timing is fortuitous, coming just a day after the announcement that Nichols will film an adaptation of Terrence McNally’s Master Class, starring Meryl Streep as a diva in the mold of Maria Callas, beginning after the turn of the year.

Related: TCA: HBO Reveals Details Of Mike Nichols/Meryl Streep ‘Master Class’

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Bruce Norris’ ‘The Qualms’ Pam MacKinnon At Helm, Rounds Out Playwrights Horizons Season

By | Friday July 11, 2014 @ 9:59am PDT

Bruce Norris’ ‘The Qualms’ Pam MacKinnon At Helm, Rounds Out Playwrights Horizons SeasonBruce Norris, whose Clybourne Park won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, returns to Playwrights Horizons next spring with The Qualms, which opens Sunday (July 13) at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company. The New York edition will begin previews May 22, 2015 at the off-Broadway nonprofit. Director of both is the very busy Pam MacKinnon, also on board with the upcoming all-star Broadway revival of Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance marqueed by Glenn Close, John Lithgow and Lindsay Duncan.

Steppenwolf describes the play this way: “At a beachside apartment complex, a group of friends gathers for their regular evening of food, drink, drugs and partner-swapping. When Chris and Kristy attempt to become the newest members, the evening does not go as planned. The artichoke dip grows cold as the party devolves into a territorial battle over mating privileges. Does sex ruin everything? And what is the purpose of monogamy? Bruce Norris’s comedy explores the eternal struggle for power, status and getting laid.”

The 67th Annual Tony Awards - Press RoomMacKinnon has fast become one of Broadway’s go-to directors while also being a Steppenwolf mainstay: her extraordinary revival of Albee’s Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? was a Broadway transfer from the Chicago company, where she also staged Clybourne Park (which had its debut at Playwrights).

The Playwrights production of The Qualms is not a co-production with Steppenwolf, per a a company spokesman, and casting, along with the rest of the creative team, will be announced at a late date.

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’90s Redux: Bill Nighy May Be Broadway-Bound In Hare’s ‘Skylight’; `Master Class’ Helmer Mike Nichols Talks Shop for HBO

By | Friday July 11, 2014 @ 8:08am PDT

’90s Redux: Bill Nighy May Be Broadway-Bound In Hare’s ‘Skylight’; `Master Class’ Helmer Mike Nichols Talks Shop for HBOThe Union Jack will be flying over Broadway big-time this coming season, as talk heats up about bringing Bill Nighy, Carey Mulligan and the acclaimed National Theatre revival of David Hare’s Skylight to New York in the spring. I wrote a few weeks ago that while the Stephen Daldry production will be telecast in the fall by NT Live, far better would be the chance to see Hare’s extraordinarily moving play — about the expired romance between an older, self-made businessman and an idealistic young teacher, roles created by Michael Gambon and Lia Williams — on Broadway.

Image (3) GerardColumn_badge__140512224655-150x150.png for post 735293This week the show, which runs in London through August, got the stamp of approval from the Times‘ Ben Brantley and Michael Reidel speculates that Scott Rudin and Robert Fox are joining forces to bring it over in the spring. I’m told that conversations are indeed going on to bring the show in. “Even more than in Richard Eyre’s fine 1996 Broadway production,” Brantley wrote of Nighy (who appeared on Broadway in Hare’s 2006 The Vertical Hour) and Mulligan, “I was always aware of how ineffably, achingly attracted each was to the other, and of the diametrically opposed ways in which that attraction became flesh.”

Skylight - Press NightSkylight will have plenty of company: September 10 will see the first performance of another celebrated National Theatre import, The Curious Incident Of The Dog in The Night-Time. And on Halloweeen, Jez Butterworth’s The River starts up at Circle In The Square with Hugh Jackman, directed by Ian Rickson (who also staged Butterworth’s amazing Jerusalem in 2011, with Mark Rylance). Read More »

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Elizabeth Ashley, Byron Jennings Head To Broadway; Teens In Jail, Love, Lust Figure In New Plays From Lincoln Center, Signature

By | Thursday July 10, 2014 @ 10:13am PDT

Elizabeth Ashley, Byron Jennings Head To Broadway; Teens In Jail, Love, Lust Figure In New Plays From Lincoln Center, SignatureStage and screen veterans Elizabeth Ashley and Byron Jennings have joined the ever-expanding cast of the upcoming Broadway revival of You Can’t Take It With You, already set to star James Earl Jones, Rose Byrne, Annaleigh Ashford and Mark-Linn Baker, among others. The show begins previews August 26 at the Longacre Theatre and opens September 28. Scott Ellis directs.

Meanwhile, Lincoln Center Theater and the Signature added new plays to their upcoming season lineups this morning, and young folks under stress — from love or lawlessness, take your pick — are prominent. Coming up first, at the Pershing Square Signature Center in August, is Naomi Wallace’s And I And Silence, in which Trae Harris (Orange Is The New Black) and Emily Skeggs (Fun Home) play younger versions of Jamie (Rachel Nicks, Nurse Jackie) and Dee (Samantha Soule, A Fable, Detroit ’67). Signature describes the play as concerning “two imprisoned teenagers, one black, one white, [who] form a perilous bond. As the young women serve time, they forge a plan for survival. When the outside world proves even more dangerous than the jail itself, their private world becomes an untenable practice ground for their new lives. And I and Silence explores the fierce dreams of youth and the brutal reality of adulthood in 1950’s America.” Caitlin McLeod, who staged the play in 2011 in London, repeats. The show begins performances August 5 and opens August 25.

"The Village Bike" Cast PhotocallLincoln Center Theater will turn its mid-size … Read More »

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