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International Emmys Laud ‘Les Revenants’, ‘Moone Boy’, Sean Bean, ‘5 Broken Cameras’

Les Revenants — an American remake of which is in development at A&E — was named best drama series of 2013 at the International Emmy Awards tonight, while Sean Bean won the best actor trophy for his role as a lit teacher with a cross-dressing alter ego in the British anthology Accused. Brazilian actress Fernanda Montenegro won best actress for her role in The Sweet Mother. The UK’s Moone Boy, about an Irish boy and his imaginary friend, took best comedy. Former The Daily Show correspondent (and newly named HBO show host) John Oliver hosted this year’s International Emmy ceremony, whose Founders Award went to J.J. Abrams, while the Directorate Award was presented to RTL Group Co-CEO Anke Schäferkordt.

Related: Sean Bean, France’s ‘The Returned’ Among International Emmy Noms

Les Revenants, the French TV series based on an obscure 2004 movie that sold only 32,000 tickets in France, was a hit on Canal Plus and sold around the world — including the UK, where it aired subtitled as The Returned this year to great interest, and on Sundance Channel. The drama is about a small town turned upside down when several local people who have been long presumed dead suddenly reappear, having not aged and unaware of their own fatality. As they attempt to resume their lives, strange phenomena and gruesome murders begin to occur. A second season is planned for Canal Plus. Read More »

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OSCARS: Nominated Docs Traverse Challenging Territory

Ari Karpel and David Mermelstein are AwardsLine contributors

From the homemade, unpolished qualities of 5 Broken Cameras and The Gatekeepers to the journalism of How To Survive A Plague and the investigations of The Invisible War and Searching For Sugar Man, this year’s documentary feature nominees traverse challenging and rewarding territory. Here’s a look at the films from which voters must choose.

5 Broken Cameras

The homemade quality that permeates 5 Broken Cameras is its greatest strength. For what this plainspoken documentary lacks in polish, it makes up for in heartfelt emotion. The film centers on the life of its filmmaker, Emad Burnat, a Palestinian resident of Bil’in, a village in the occupied West Bank near the Israeli border. It opens with the birth of Burnat’s son Gibreel in 2005. Then, paralleling the first few years of Gibreel’s life, the film charts the hardships endured by the village as it copes with the erection of a barrier, built by Israel, that separates Bil’in from its olives groves.

RELATED: Documentary Rule Changes Leave Members A Little More Optimistic

“I just started to film and document my people’s nonviolent struggles in the village in 2005”, Burnat says, speaking recently by phone from Bil’in. “I decided to take part with my camera. I used it for many purposes. I was the only one in my village with a camera. I used it to … Read More »

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Palestinian Doc ‘5 Broken Cameras’ Takes Top Cinema Eye Prize

By | Wednesday January 9, 2013 @ 8:59pm PST

Five Broken Cameras, Emad Burnat and Guy Davidi’s documentary about Israeli settlements encroaching upon Burnat’s Palestinian village, was named best feature tonight at the 6th Annual Cinema Eye Honors for Nonfiction Filmmaking at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, Queens. Michael Moore accepted the award for Burnat and Davidi. Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady’s Detropia was the only film to win two awards, Outstanding Direction for the veteran NYC-duo, and Outstanding Original Score for Dial.81. Another directing duo, Jason Tippet and Elizabeth Mims, took honors for Outstanding Debut for their high school love triangle doc, Only the Young. Read More »

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