GLAAD Media Awards Honor Chaz Bono, Josh Hutcherson, ‘Modern Family’, ‘Drop Dead Diva’, ‘Hot In Cleveland’, ‘Beginners’

GLAAD, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation organization awarded its honors in Los Angeles tonight for most outstanding images of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community in the media. AP is reporting that the 23rd Annual GLAAD Media … Read More »

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Oscar Winner Christopher Plummer’s ‘Barrymore’ Finds Distribution

By | Tuesday March 13, 2012 @ 4:12pm PDT
Pete Hammond

Christopher Plummer is on a roll. A month after winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Beginners,Christopher Plummer Barrymore his much-acclaimed Tony-winning performance in Barrymore, which premiered at the 2011 Toronto Film Festival. has found distribution. It will open in select theaters in Canada in May and in October in the U.S. and around the world. BY Experience, a New York-based alternative content company that specializes in special- and live-event theatrical releases, will distribute. Since launching in 2003, it have brought a number of specialty presentations to 1700 screens in more than 50 countries with a list that includes the Met Live In HD series, the UK’s National Theatre Live series, the Roundabout Theatre Company’s  production of The Importance Of Being Earnest and musical events among others. Read More »

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OSCARS: Christopher Plummer — ‘Beginners’

By | Sunday February 19, 2012 @ 11:27am PST

In a feature film career spanning more than half a century (starting with Stage Struck in 1958), Christopher Plummer has played heroic roles from Roman general Commodus to Sherlock Holmes and, most memorably, Captain Von Trapp in The Sound of Music. Yet the 81-year-old Canadian was never satisfied being the leading man, preferring the challenge of darker character parts — think Detective Mackey in Dolores Claiborne in 1995. For all the respect and acclaim he’s earned for such a diverse filmography, though, Plummer has received precisely one Oscar nomination: a supporting nod for The Last Station in 2010.

Plummer is in the running for his first Oscar again, for a different kind of heroic role, in Mike Mills’ semi-autobiographical second feature Beginners. He plays Hal, who at 75 reveals his hidden homosexuality to his grown son Oliver (Ewan McGregor). Feisty, upbeat and — sorry, captain — coming off as very much a leading man, Plummer entertained an enthusiastic audience in Hollywood following a recent screening of Beginners. Deadline Awards Columnist Pete Hammond was there to guide the conversation. Here are some highlights. Read More »

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Gotham Awards: ‘Tree Of Life,’ ‘Beginners’ Share Kudos For Best Feature

Mike Fleming

Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life and Mike Mills’ Beginners shared the best feature award at Monday night’s 21st Annual Gotham Independent Film Awards. Other nominees for Best Feature were nominees were The Descendants, Meek’s Cutoff and Take Shelter. GirlfriendRead More »

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HAMMOND: ‘Bridesmaids’, ‘Artist’, ‘Paris’ Try To Buck Oscar’s Prejudice Against Comedy; HFPA Says ‘The Help’ Is Not Funny

Pete Hammond

Dying is easy, comedy is hard. Someone said that, right?

Judging by the paltry number of “pure” comedies that have won Best Picture Oscars in the past, apparently the Academy doesn’t think it’s hard at all. But could this actually be the year comedy will once again get its due in the Best Picture race? Will we ever see another genuine laugher taken seriously? “It’s crazy when you see what these great comedy people do,” says Bridesmaids producer Judd Apatow. His film was a huge surprise summer hit and has one of the highest critics ratings on Rotten Tomatoes with 90% fresh reviews. That’s a lot better than many dramatic contenders that pundits take more seriously as true Oscar pictures. Broad, hit-’em-in-the-gut comedy is almost always dismissed.

Apatow told me he was really surprised when Bridesmaids started to become part of the awards conversation this year but now believes they have a shot, at least in some categories — although not daring to dream of Best Picture yet. “We’re very hopeful about Melissa McCarthy in supporting. (Co-writer and star) Kristen Wiig  should get recognition  too. It’s very hard to do what she does,” Apatow said, adding that he thought Zach Galifianakis in The Hangover (which Apatow did not produce) should have been recognized a couple of years ago for the “perfect supporting part” but was obviously overlooked.

Further proving disrespect for comedy in the Acad, Apatow himself was dissed even to become an Academy member until finally getting the invite in 2008. Considering the Academy’s usual reluctance to reward the genre, Wiig is shocked they are even in the hunt, but Bridesmaids is the only movie Universal is significantly campaigning this year. “It’s nuts,” she said. “Recently we were looking at our original draft and thinking the fact people are even talking about it in this way is very strange. But I think ultimately it’s about the story and characters. You have to care about them or you’re not going to care about the movie whether it is comedy or drama.”

Bridesmaids is also hoping for recognition as a Best Picture Comedy or Musical nominee in the Golden Globes, where it actually does have a realistic chance of making the cut (The Hangover actually won). Many have called for the Academy to institute separate categories to honor comedy, like the Globes have always done, but it has never flown.

It is not hard to see why.

Often there’s a very gray line between what constitutes a comedy in the first place.  The Hollywood Foreign Press lets studios determine which categories they want to be in but has final say. In other words, if a studio tries to squeeze J. Edgar into comedy because there is less competition, forget it. This year, there has been lots of discussion among distributors about what constitutes a comedy. Fox Searchlight initially debated whether to enter its George Clooney starrer The Descendants in the Comedy or Musical category because there are definite laughs, but the dramatic elements ruled the day and it is submitted as a drama. Same with Sony’s Moneyball, which had some TV ads with quotes calling it “hilarious.” In the end, it wasn’t that hilarious — it’s in drama.

On the other hand, DreamWorks officially submitted The Help in comedy or musical even though it has some very heavy dramatic moments. On Monday, an HFPA committee rejected it in comedy and determined it would compete as a drama, where it will go head-to-head with Disney/DreamWorks’ other big hopeful, War Horse (assuming both get nominated, as seems likely). It’s not surprising: At a recent event I attended, a lot of HFPA members were voicing concerns about having to judge The Help as a comedy. The film was indeed initially sold by Disney and DreamWorks with an emphasis on its lighter elements, and past Globe winners in the category such as Driving Miss Daisy were similar in tone. Still, that would have meant Viola Davis would compete in the Best Actress-Comedy or Musical category, and no matter how you slice it, her character — a civil rights-era maid — just wasn’t that funny. Other entries that remain in the category that border comedy and drama are Focus Features’ Beginners and Summit’s 50/50, both dealing with main characters with cancer; Paramount’s Young Adult; and The Weinstein Company’s My Week With Marilyn. But the placement seems logical, and their chances against stiff competition in the drama categories would be considerably lessened. Last year, Focus entered the dramedy The Kids Are All Right in the comedy categories and bagged Globes for both the picture and Annette Bening. Read More »

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