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‘Inception,’ ‘Titans’ Headed To TNT

Nellie Andreeva

inception posterTNT has landed the TV rights to Chris Nolan’s blockbuster Inception in a deal between parent company Turner and corporate sibling Warner Bros. that includes several other WB titles: romantic comedies Sex And the City 2 and Valentine’s Day, action flicks Clash of the Titans and Jonah Hex and the upcoming Robert Downey Jr./Zach Galifianakis comedy Due Date. Inception, Clash of the Titans and Jonah Hex are headed to drama-focused TNT, while the 3 comedies, Sex and the City, Valentine’s Day and Due Date will run on comedy-centered sister network TBS. All are expected to premiere between mid-2012 and early 2013. The licensee fee is believed to be in the standard 10-12% range of the movies’ domestic box-office, depending on their performance. Inception, which is poised to cross the $100 million mark tomorrow morning, would certainly command a premium license fee of 12% and could go as high as $24 million if the thriller starring Leonardo DiCaprio crosses the $200 million mark domestically. The deal for Inception comes on the heels of FX’s acquisition of another hot summer action newcomer, the upcoming Angelina Jolie starrer Salt.

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Who Wants To Lose A Lawsuit? Celador Wins ‘Millionaire’ Case Against Disney

millionaire-logo-mediumThe jury in the Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? lawsuit returned a verdict for UK-based Celador today finding that the show’s producer was harmed by Disney’s self-dealing actions. The panel awarded damages totalling $269.2 million for the fair market value of broadcast licensing fees, and revenue from Millionaire merchandise. That just shy of the $405M which Celador was seeking. Immediately, the Walt Disney Company issued this statement: “We believe this verdict is fundamentally wrong and will aggressively seek to have it reversed.” The month-long Riverside trial followed six years of legal maneuvering over profits from the hit game show in a rare look into TV network and studio accounting practices. Celador convinced the jury that the producer earned millions of dollars less than it could have from the success of the show because Disney-owned ABC and co-producer Buena Vista TV brokered sweetheart deals with themselves.

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