Christopher Plummer Joins ‘The Forger,’ Ben McKenzie To Lead ‘The Swimmer,’ ‘Love Is Strange’ Adds Darren Burrows

By | Saturday September 7, 2013 @ 3:55pm PDT

Code Entertainment‘s The Forger has added Oscar winner Christopher Plummer to its cast. Plummer joins John Travolta and Tye Sheridan (Mud) in the heist pic to be helmed by Philip Martin (BBC’s Wallander). Travolta plays a former art prodigy and second generation petty thief who buys his way out of prison to spend time with his ailing son. To do so he must team up with his father (Plummer) for one last job to pay back the syndicate that arranged his release. Code Entertainment’s Al Corley, Eugene Musso, and Bart Rosenblatt and Lisa Wilson and Myles Nestel of The Solution Entertainment Group are producing along with Rob Carliner. Anson Downes and Linda Favila are co-exec producing. Filming begins in Boston in October. The Solution is selling international rights at Toronto; WME Global and ICM are repping domestic sales. Plummer is repped by ICM and The Pitt Group.

Southland‘s Ben McKenzie is set to star in The Swimmer, about an American extreme swimmer who sets out to conquer one of Norway’s wildest rivers and in doing so must confront his inner demons. BiFrost Pictures is financing and will produce the pic written by Bard Ivar Engelsas and directed by Richard L. Fox. The Swimmer is backed by the U.S.-Norway Film Development Project as well as the regional film funds of Norway and will also star Norwegian thesps Agnes Kittelsen and Kristoffer Joner. BiFrost’s Daniel Wagner is producing with Lisa G. Black of Garnet Girl, LLC and Brandi Savitt of Senza Pictures along with Sweet Films AS. Filming is set to begin in Norway in June 2014. McKenzie is repped by CAA and Management 360. Read More »

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Christopher Plummer Replaces Michael Caine In ‘Imagine’

By | Thursday June 27, 2013 @ 1:21pm PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: Christopher Plummer will join Jennifer Garner, Al Pacino, Annette Bening and Bobby Cannavale in Imagine, the film that gets underway July 1 in Los Angeles with Crazy, Stupid, Love scribe Dan Fogelman making his directorial debut. … Read More »

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OSCARS: Last Year’s Acting Winners Returning To Present

By | Tuesday February 5, 2013 @ 9:07am PST

BEVERLY HILLS, CA – Last year’s Academy Award® winners Meryl Streep, Jean Dujardin, Octavia Spencer and Christopher Plummer will return to present on this year’s telecast, show producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today.

“We are honored to have

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Shirley MacLaine & Christopher Plummer Join ‘Elsa & Fred’

By | Wednesday October 31, 2012 @ 1:30pm PDT

Oscar winners Christopher Plummer and Shirley MacLaine will star in the English-language remake of Elsa & Fred. Based on the 2005 Spanish-Argentine … Read More »

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Oscar Winner Christopher Plummer’s ‘Barrymore’ Finds Distribution

By | Tuesday March 13, 2012 @ 4:12pm PDT
Pete Hammond

Christopher Plummer is on a roll. A month after winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Beginners,Christopher Plummer Barrymore his much-acclaimed Tony-winning performance in Barrymore, which premiered at the 2011 Toronto Film Festival. has found distribution. It will open in select theaters in Canada in May and in October in the U.S. and around the world. BY Experience, a New York-based alternative content company that specializes in special- and live-event theatrical releases, will distribute. Since launching in 2003, it have brought a number of specialty presentations to 1700 screens in more than 50 countries with a list that includes the Met Live In HD series, the UK’s National Theatre Live series, the Roundabout Theatre Company’s  production of The Importance Of Being Earnest and musical events among others. Read More »

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OSCARS: Christopher Plummer — ‘Beginners’

By | Sunday February 19, 2012 @ 11:27am PST

In a feature film career spanning more than half a century (starting with Stage Struck in 1958), Christopher Plummer has played heroic roles from Roman general Commodus to Sherlock Holmes and, most memorably, Captain Von Trapp in The Sound of Music. Yet the 81-year-old Canadian was never satisfied being the leading man, preferring the challenge of darker character parts — think Detective Mackey in Dolores Claiborne in 1995. For all the respect and acclaim he’s earned for such a diverse filmography, though, Plummer has received precisely one Oscar nomination: a supporting nod for The Last Station in 2010.

Plummer is in the running for his first Oscar again, for a different kind of heroic role, in Mike Mills’ semi-autobiographical second feature Beginners. He plays Hal, who at 75 reveals his hidden homosexuality to his grown son Oliver (Ewan McGregor). Feisty, upbeat and — sorry, captain — coming off as very much a leading man, Plummer entertained an enthusiastic audience in Hollywood following a recent screening of Beginners. Deadline Awards Columnist Pete Hammond was there to guide the conversation. Here are some highlights. Read More »

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BAFTA Awards: What ‘Artist’, Dujardin, Streep Wins Mean For Oscar – Hammond

Pete Hammond

If there was any question before today’s British Academy Film Awards that The Artist was the film to beat for the Oscars, the results in London just cemented it, and in an impressive sweep that portends big things. It wasn’t just the … Read More »

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SAG, DGA Results Split Between ‘Artist’ And ‘The Help’ Adding Intrigue To Oscar Race: Hammond

Pete Hammond

The Help’s Viola Davis certainly got a leg up in her fierce Best Actress race against The Weinstein Company’s duo Meryl Streep and Michelle Williams, and Help’s Octavia Spencer continued on her supporting actress … Read More »

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Christopher Plummer To Receive Santa Barbara’s Modern Master Award

By | Thursday December 15, 2011 @ 3:24pm PST

Santa Barbara To Honor Martin Scorsese

The Santa Barbara International Film Festival will bestow the Modern Master Award to Christopher Plummer during a tribute January 28. It’s the highest honor presented by the festival, which previously awarded it to Michael … Read More »

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OSCARS: Stellar Work By Veterans May Keep Upstarts Out Of Supporting Actor Race

Pete Hammond

Although there are some young Hollywood turks trying to break through in an ‘Extremely Large and Incredibly Close’ race for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar, 2011 may eventually become known as the year of the veteran. Acting legends with decades of iconic screen performances and Oscar winners dominate the field of frontrunners in one of Oscar’s most crowded and intriguing categories. With names like Christopher Plummer, Max von Sydow, Ben Kingsley, Nick Nolte, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Albert Brooks, Kenneth Branagh, Tom Hanks and Robert Forster in the mix, the pedigree of contenders for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role is formidable indeed. But could a relative newcomer like Jonah Hill or Patton Oswalt swoop in and take the whole thing? Here are the major players.

FRONTRUNNERS
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER, BEGINNERS

Plummer turns 82 this month and is enjoying a major resurgence in a film acting career that goes back to 1958, when he made his debut in Stage Struck. Since then his fine screen roles have often been eclipsed by his own stage-struck ways with a number of memorable performances in the theater including a couple that won him Tony Awards. He only just received his first Oscar nomination two years ago for The Last Station, but with his touching role as a 75-year-old widower who finally decides to come out of the closet, he may grab the actual statuette this time. An effective, if small, supporting role in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo only adds to his chances.

MAX von SYDOW, EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLOSE
With a life spent before the cameras for over 60 years, the 82-year-old von Sydow is an acting legend whose work ranges from several landmark Ingmar Bergman films to the harrowing Exorcist. Yet like Plummer (who is just eight months his junior), he incredibly has been Oscar-nominated only once, for 1987’s Pelle the Conqueror. But his touching and completely wordless performance as a distant grandfather in Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close could finally be his ticket to the Kodak stage.

KENNETH BRANAGH, MY WEEK WITH MARILYN
Another acting icon, Laurence Olivier, is also part of this year’s supporting race — but in this case he is being channeled by none other than Olivier fan and student Kenneth Branagh, who portrays Olivier in 1956 as he was directing and starring with Marilyn Monroe in The Prince And The Showgirl. Branagh has tackled many Olivier screen roles like Henry V and Hamlet (he even directed the remake of Olivier’s Sleuth), but taking on the actual persona of the man himself was particularly challenging and puts him — and his mentor — right back in the Oscar race.

BEN KINGSLEY, HUGO
Already an Oscar winner for 1982’s Gandhi, Kingsley effectively takes on the role of film pioneer Georges Melies in Martin Scorsese’s valentine to the early days of movies. With a total of four nominations split evenly between lead and supporting categories, Kingsley is an Academy favorite who once again creates a memorable character, one with great meaning for the filmmakers who will be voting. Will being the only serious candidate in a 3D movie also separate him from the pack?

ALBERT BROOKS, DRIVE
Until now Brooks was only known for comedy — those he wrote and directed and those he starred in. He was even previously Oscar-nominated for his hilarious supporting turn in 1987’s Broadcast News. But none of his previous work prepared critics and audiences for his nasty, villainous Bernie Rose in the noirish thriller Drive. But his brilliant interpretation and cool new screen persona should deservedly win him a second Oscar nomination.

BRAD PITT, THE TREE OF LIFE
Pitt is a double threat this year. He’s already won the New York Film Critics award given for both Moneyball and The Tree Of Life, and ever since its debut in Cannes, Terrence Malick’s Palme d’Or winner has sparked Oscar buzz for Pitt’s effectively low-key change-of-pace and critically acclaimed work as a 1950s-era father. Could he become one of those rare thesps who score both supporting and lead actor nominations in the same year? Don’t bet against it.

JONAH HILL, MONEYBALL
Pitt’s co-star in Moneyball who was best known for his antics in movies like Superbad enjoyed his first taste of awards buzz for shedding several pounds and shrewdly underplaying the whiz-kid genius who comes up with an inexpensive formula to create a winning baseball team. Going head to head with Pitt, Hill proved he could hold his own just as he did in last year’s lesser-known Cyrus.

KEVIN SPACEY,  MARGIN CALL
Although the film was well-received at its Sundance debut, Margin Call was not considered a major awards contender, even by its own distributor. That has changed with several early awards and Oscar talk for two-time winner Kevin Spacey, who has spent a lot more time in recent years running London’s Old Vic rather than on his own film career. A change-of-pace performance won raves and could put Spacey back in the front row at the Oscars.

PATTON OSWALT, YOUNG ADULT
Perhaps best known as a stand-up comedian and the voice of the lead rat in Pixar’s Ratatouille, Oswalt is quickly establishing his credentials as a serious actor, first in the critically acclaimed indie film The Big Fan and now on a larger scale as a lonely man whose life was defined by an unfortunate incident in high school. His scenes opposite Charlize Theron are awkward, funny, poignant and memorable. Read More »

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Anthony LaPaglia Joins ‘Django Unchained’, Laments Hardships Pushing Film Actors To TV

Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: Anthony LaPaglia has joined Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained cast. LaPaglia will play the leader of a group of greedy Australians who encounter slave-turned-bounty hunter Django (Jamie Foxx) as they are escorting a group of slaves recently purchased as fighters. LaPaglia said he and Joseph Gordon-Levitt will play mean brothers, and LaPaglia said he was bowled over by the script. “It’s wildly ambitious and imaginative, deals with that subject matter in a way it hasn’t been dealt with before,” LaPaglia told me. “The way the cast has shaped up, it’s exciting to be involved.” It will be the second film in a row where LaPaglia can readopt the Australian accent he grew up with but dropped for many of his Hollywood roles and the series Without A Trace. He wrapped the PJ Hogan-directed Mental with Toni Collette and Liev Schreiber, a film that LaPaglia said is partly based on the filmmaker’s own experiences. “I play the father, who in real life had committed his mother to a mental institution, who had five kids, picked up a hitchhiker [Collette] on the way back and said, you’re taking care of the kids now.” LaPaglia said Hogan got rights to tunes from The Sound Of Music, and uses them in unexpected ways. “I absolutely assassinate “Edelweiss,” just tear it to shreds so badly that I’m sure Christopher Plummer would have a fit. It was meant to be terrible, and it is.” Read More »

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HAMMOND: Oscar Hopefuls Swarm Hollywood Awards Gala

Pete Hammond

Across town, as President Barack Obama was drawing every celebrity not in contention for awards this season, the 15th annual Hollywood Awards Gala was taking place at the Beverly Hilton. All of the Oscar hopefuls who agreed to show up to accept an award were there in their Monday finest as this was a place to be seen if you want an ego boost at this early point in the season.

With 19 above- and below-the-line categories to plow through, this was a surprisingly fun show that, if it didn’t already exist, Hollywood would have to find some way to invent. Billed as the ”official” kickoff to awards season (if you don’t count all those film festivals we’ve just been through), The Hollywood Awards were created — and basically chosen — by executive director Carlos de Abreu, who, with Janice Pennington, founded the gala and accompanying film festival. They are the result of a months-long negotiation between him and the studios and distributors, who are using this early opportunity to get key positioning for the players they hope to advance during the long awards season leading ultimately to Oscar. The only caveat is that to get the award, you have to agree to show up.

This year, de Abreu has his pulse on some real contenders and handed out acting awards to — among many others — Michelle Williams, George Clooney and Christopher Plummer, who all could realistically be considered close to frontrunners in their respective categories.

A real highlight of the show was when Marilyn Monroe’s Oscar-nominated Bus Stop co-star Don Murray showed up to present Hollywood Actress of the Year to Williams, who plays the iconic star in The Weinstein Company’s My Week With Marilyn“I’m the last of the the on-screen lovers of Marilyn Monroe, and I still just happen to have a body that actually works, ” the 82-year-old actor said to much laughter. “Michelle re-created moments I was so intimately familiar with as I spent 14 months working with Marilyn. There’s not one thing in this film that’s not truthful. It was a revelation. Michelle’s performance made me appreciate Marilyn Monroe  so much more.”

Williams, noticeably nervous, said her friends always wanted to see her win a award so she could basically sweat through the experience. She did well though, closing with a touching perception about Monroe. “It seems to me that all Marilyn Monroe wanted was to be taken seriously as an actress, and she studied so hard and never really got there,” she said, adding that it was ironic Williams herself could get this kind of recognition that so eluded the star she played.

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Toronto: ‘Descendants’ Premiere Gets Big Reaction, Searchlight Has No Shame About Pickup Of Controversial ‘Shame’

Pete Hammond

Fox Seachlight’s annual party at the Thompson Hotel for the Toronto International Film Festival seemed especially ebullient Saturday after its growing Oscar contender, The Descendants, premiered to a standing ovation. Exactly a week earlier, the film received a similar enthusiastic response in Telluride. On top of that, Searchlight’s co-presidents Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula had just won rights over The Weinstein Company and Sony Pictures Classics to the controversial Steve McQueen-directed Shame, which missed out Saturday on the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival but did nab star Michael Fassbender the Best Actor prize for his raw, let-it-all-hang-out performance as a sexually addicted man in freefall.

Shame Michael Fassbender Carey MulliganUtley confirmed that Searchlight will release Shame this year in time for the Oscar race, possibly December. Although they have not dated it, they do want enough time to put a campaign together. She was thrilled that Fassbender got the Venice prize for the film, which premieres in Toronto tomorrow night, after Read More »

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2011 Toronto Festival Fills Out Slate And Sets Maverick Lecture Program

Mike Fleming

The 2011 Toronto International Film Festival has filled out the rest of its slate, which consists of 268 features and 68 short films that will unspool next month. The fest announced that the likes of Brad Pitt (Moneyball), … Read More »

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