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Atari’s 1983 ‘E.T.’ Game Cover-Up Unearthed In New Mexico By Xbox Docu Crew – How Bad Was It?

By | Sunday April 27, 2014 @ 10:54am PDT

Atari E.T. game DocumentaryLightbox and XBox Studios earned a ton of press this weekend when an excavation crew unearthed hundreds of buried cartridges of Atari‘s 1982 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial video game in a dumpsite in Alamogordo, N.M. The archaeological discovery confirmed a long-held legend in the gaming world that Atari had buried millions of unsold units of what’s believed to be one of the worst games ever made when it tanked over 30 years ago. Saturday’s dig was filmed for a docu directed by Zak Penn (X-Men: The Last Stand, Incident at Loch Ness) and produced by Oscar-winning docu producer Simon Chinn (Searching for Sugar Man, Man On Wire) and his cousin, Emmy-winning producer Jonathan Chinn (American High) for their Lightbox banner. Fuel Entertainment obtained the rights to excavate the landfill. Docu series Atari: Game Over is set to air this year on Xbox One and Xbox 360. Just how bad was the E.T. game, famously rushed into production to capitalize off of Steven Spielberg’s hit blockbuster?

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Atari’s U.S. Business Files For Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection

By | Monday January 21, 2013 @ 2:05pm PST

UPDATED: This should bring back wistful memories for gamers who recall how products including Pong, Tank, and the Atari 2600 shaped the video game industry back in the 1970s — and painful ones for media industry veterans. The French company that owns Atari said today that its U.S. business filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection as it looks to sell or restructure the operation. Hours later, Atari S.A. also filed for bankruptcy in France under Book 6 of that country’s commercial code, according to the LA Times. The Execs made the decision after Atari’s main shareholder and lender, investment firm BlueBay, said it couldn’t find anyone to buy the game company — and couldn’t continue to fund it. (Two of BlueBay’s funds are in liquidation.) The filing comes in advance of a credit facility due on March 31 as the company says it “has been starved for funds and unable to finance its continued growth.” Atari CEO Jim Wilson says that by auctioning the U.S. assets “we will seek to maximize the proceeds in the best interest of the company and all of its shareholders.”

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R.I.P. Carlo Rambaldi

By | Friday August 10, 2012 @ 2:06pm PDT

Special effects artist Carlo Rambaldi, best known for his work on Steven Spielberg’s E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, died today at his home in southern Italy after a long illness, The Associated Press reports. He was 86. Rambaldi worked on more than 30 films, receiving two visual effects Oscars for E.T. (1982), and Alien (1979). He also won a Special Achievement Academy Award for King Kong (1976). Rambaldi was known as a master of mechatronics, a discipline which includes mechanical, electronic and system design engineering. He was born in northern Italy and graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Bologna in 1951. Rambaldi was lured into film when he was asked to create a dragon for a low-budget science fiction movie in 1956. His other film credits include Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977), Possession (1981) and Dune (1984).

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Universal Launches Year-Long Centennial Celebration; Announces Major Restoration Of 13 Classics

Pete Hammond

Universal this month is launching a yearlong 2012 centennial celebration with an ambitious and almost unprecedented film-restoration effort, a new logo, a swarm of special-edition Blu-ray movie packages, theme park celebrations emphasizing their film history, special events, premieres, and a major social media campaign. Like Paramount, which is also embarking on a centennial celebration, the emphasis here is making the old seem new again. Key among Universal’s plans is the complete restoration of 13 films that showcase a large part of the history of the studio — from 1930′s All Quiet On The Western Front to 1993′s Schindler’s List.

When I spoke with Universal president and COO Ron Meyer on Monday morning, his excitement about this opportunity to mark the studio’s storied past and take it into the future was evident. “One hundred years is such a great milestone,” he said. “I am a movie lover. It’s such an important part of the American culture, a part of the heritage of this country. I think we have a responsibility  to our employees, to the public to celebrate not just a milestone but celebrate the movie business, and this gives us a reason to do it.” He emphasized the centerpiece of this yearlong effort: the restoration of many Universal classics each uniquely repping their own decades.

Films chosen to get the full restoration treatment — in addition to the aforementioned All’s Quiet and Schindler’s List — are  both 1931 versions of Dracula, Frankenstein (1931),  The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Abbott and Costello’s Buck Privates (1941), Pillow Talk (1959), To Kill A Mockingbird (1962), The Birds (1963), The Sting (1973), Jaws (1975), and Out of Africa (1985). That’s actually 12 titles altogether, but there are 13 films since the studio is restoring both 1931 versions of Dracula — including Bela Lugosi’s famous English-language picture and the Spanish version that was filmed on the same sets at night. Pillow Talk repping the ’50s was one of Universal’s biggest hits ever to that time, earning an Original Screenplay Oscar and Doris Day’s only Oscar nomination. It seems an interesting and  inspired choice to me, and to Meyer. “What a great movie,” he said. “I have four children who don’t know these movies. They don’t know a Doris Day movie or Rock Hudson movies. And they are going to enjoy them when they see them. Once they see it they can appreciate it. There’s no way for even 30-year olds to know some of those movies unless they are film buffs.” Read More »

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HAMMOND: ‘War Horse’ Campaign Begins; Can Steven Spielberg Win Another Oscar?

Pete Hammond

The horse is out of the bag. Steven Spielberg’s much-awaited epic War Horse began its industry screenings in earnest this afternoon, Thanksgiving Day, in both New York and Los Angeles by inviting members (via trade ads and website Monday) of most guilds , critics groups,  and, of course, the Academy to special holiday weekend screenings that will continue through Sunday in both cities as well as San Francisco (Fri-Sun).  In addition , as previously announced , there will be public sneaks in NYC and nine other cities on Sunday afteroon (10:30AM in LA at AMC Century City) followed by a Q&A with Spielberg in NY that will be satellited to the other cities as well as streamed live on MSN.com. It is an innovative “one-stop shopping” tactic on the part of Dreamworks (and Disney who distributes)  since Spielberg is on the east coast currently shooting Lincoln and not available for the usual round of campaign activities. Its “World Premiere” will take place December 4th at Avery Fisher Hall in NYC.

The big launch is on now even though the film was completed for all intents and purposes in September. At the Labor Day weekend Telluride Film Festival producer Kathleen Kennedy told me they only had the D.I. to complete at that time, but even though it was ready the film, which opens on December 25, has skipped the festival circuit in favor of its own circuitous route to release. That included the unusual strategy of employing surprise “pop up” screenings Nov 1-10 in small towns like Bellvue  Wa, Leawood and  Olathe Ks, Cleveland Heights Oh, Beaverton Or, Bethesda MD and Plymouth Meeting, PA indicating a “heartland” strategy in order to get word of mouth moving .   That same week Dreamworks started quietly showing the film to select media (including Deadline)  on the big screen at the Disney lot’s main theatre. A strict embargo existed until today right after the first Thanksgiving screening when most media and industry types would have had at least the opportunity to begin seeing it. So expect a lot of industry and media twittering, facebooking and reviews to start almost immediately with still a solid month to go before its Christmas day wide opening.

What Spielberg has wrought is a stunning looking and highly emotional epic that is Hollywood moviemaking at its best, and seems likely to be the filmmaker’s most Academy- friendly work since his Oscar winners, Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan. Is it old-fashioned?  You bet , but in this fast-moving techno culture that may be a welcome thing.  Spielberg is known to be a great admirer of David Lean  and with its sweeping vistas, deliberate pacing and epic story of one horse’s remarkable journey through the front lines of World War I, the film could almost be a tribute to the great director of such classics as Lawrence of Arabia and The Bridge on the River Kwai. Just for the craft alone Oscar nominations would seem to be assured for Best Picture and Director,  John Williams’ score, Rick Carter’s production design,Michael Kahn’s editing, the sound work and  Janusz Kaminski’s  striking cinematography. Although there hasn’t been much buzz about the cast which includes Jeremy Irvine, David Thewlis,  Emily Watson, Benedict Cumberbatch and Peter Mullan, they  don’t strike any false notes delivering fine performances, and Tom Hiddleston’s  Captain Nichols  could even merit some Best Supporting Actor talk  though that category is almost impossibly tough this year. As for the horses there should be some kind of separate Academy Award. They are suprisingly expressive (one of them came from Seabiscuit). The film , in look and execution is easily the best of its genre since Carroll Ballard’s The Black Stallion in 1979, a movie that earned a handful of Oscar nods but shamefully didn’t even get a Cinematography nomination for Caleb Deschanel’s landmark cinematography.

War Horse is probably too emotional and traditional  to earn much love on the hardcore unsentimental critics awards circuit, but I imagine it will fare very well  at the CCMA’s, Golden Globes, and Oscars, even though some of the Academy’s more recent Best Picture choices, notably No Country For Old Men, Slumdog Millionaire and The Hurt Locker among others indicate a different sensibility than the kind of once-traditional “bigger”, more craft-laden  film the Academy once favored, and a category into which War Horse definitely falls.  Although The King’s Speech triumph last year over the more trendy critics choice of The Social Network might indicate there is still room for less edgy, more “traditional” films in the heart of the Academy voter. We’ll have to wait to see, but the sheer scope of War Horse certainly gives it its own niche against smaller favored Best Pic hopefuls (seen so far) like The Descendants, The Artist, Midnight In Paris and Moneyball.

On the other hand voters might think Spielberg has had enough accolades (3 Oscars, a Thalberg award, AFI Life Achievement and Kennedy Center Honors), plus Read More »

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