Check Out Our New Look

EMMYS: 2011 Drama Series Overview

This year’s Emmy race for Outstanding Drama Series will continue cable’s dominance in this most prestigious category. Cable claimed 10 of the 13 nomination spots over the past two years, and 13 of 19 since 2008. By contrast, cable earned a mere nine nods combined in the seven years between 2001 and 2007 when the networks still ruled. The shift from broadcast is so extreme in 2011 that CBS’ The Good Wife is considered the only network series with a solid shot to earn its second nomination in as many years. (Though not in that league, NBC/DirecTV’s Friday Night Lights, NBC’s Parenthood, and CBS’ Blue Bloods deserve consideration while ABC has entered a rebuilding phase.) The sad reality is that the broadcast networks, which just signed a new eight-year deal with the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences to carry the Emmys, are facing a possible first-ever shutout from the top drama series category. That’s because of the continuing strength and ambition of programming on cable — in particular, HBO in a return to form, and AMC still on a roll.

HBO’s Prohibition-era hourlong Boardwalk Empire drew the most critical attention this Emmy season because of its pedigreed producer team, headed by the legendary Martin Scorsese and creator/showrunner Terence Winter, a Sopranos alum. How interesting that the pay channel’s expensive serial will compete against another period drama from that other Sopranos alum Matt Weiner. AMC’s first acclaimed original series, Mad Men, has won this category three years running and is bidding this year to be the first series to win four in a row since NBC’s The West Wing (2000- 2003). Though the frontrunner, Mad Men could be hurt by a long hiatus.

AMC has seized the mantle from HBO as TV’s preeminent quality-drama purveyor with a pair of newcomers that could crack the series field this year: the zombie-themed hour The Walking Dead, and the dark murder mystery The Killing. Even though two-time category nominee Breaking Bad is not eligible for 2011, AMC could still land three nods, becoming the first network in 10 years to do so in this category, after NBC scored the hat trick in 2001 with The West Wing, ER, and Law & Order. No cable network has ever managed the feat to date.

And then there’s Showtime, whose Dexter is in the running for its fourth consecutive Outstanding Drama nomination, along with first-season Shameless. FX is pushing its increasingly buzzed-about Western, Justified and, to a lesser extent, Sons Of Anarchy. TNT wants attention for The Closer, Men Of A Certain Age, and Southland. USA is pressing Covert Affairs and White Collar. Here’s our assessment of the chances for this year’s drama series in alphabetical order: Read More »

Comments 25

EMMYS: Q&A With ‘Breaking Bad’ Drama Series Nominee Vince Gilligan

Vince Gilligan, age 43, is the creator and executive producer of the third year AMC drama Breaking Bad that’s been nominated for its second consecutive Emmy for Outstanding Drama Series. This year, it competes with Mad Men, Dexter, The Good Wife, Lost, and True Blood. Formerly a writer and producer on Fox’s The X-Files, Gilligan spoke with Ray Richmond for Deadline Hollywood about the show’s ratings challenges and how he suffers trying to live up to audience expectations:

Deadline Hollywood: Are you surprised that Sony and AMC keep renewing the show despite the numbers?

Vince Gilligan: Let me just say that I think both the studio and the network have been courageous in putting their money where their mouth is. It’s a testament to both of them. But you know, no matter how many Emmys we get nominated for, or win, there are certain financial truths to this business, and if you don’t make any money you can’t stay on forever. We’ve shown growth in our numbers each year. And we do very well for AMC, which is itself a growing network. If you look back to the early years of USA Network or FX when they started producing scripted originals, you’ll note a similar genesis. It’s unrealistic to expect that kind of audience from Day One.

DH: Is it at all daunting to have created a show that you now have to continually live up to?

VG: The answer is yes. But as my agent likes to say, it’s a high class problem to have – but a problem nonetheless. There’s always that neurotic fear of failing in my mind, Read More »

Comments (9)