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UPDATE: MPAA Approves ‘Fed Up’ Key Art After “Reconsideration”

By | Wednesday April 16, 2014 @ 10:09pm PDT

FEDUP_keyart_RadiusUPDATED Wednesday, 10:09 PM: After “a reconsideration” of its earlier hard stance against the Key Art for the documentary Fed Up citing ‘offensive language’, the MPAA’s advertising administration reversed its decision late Wednesday night and will now allow the art for the Radius-TWC docu without any alterations, a source close to the situation told Deadline.

So, TWC’s F U is OK. TY MPAA.

PREVIOUSLY, Wednesday, 5:07 P.M.: The MPAA has rejected the key art for Fed Up, a documentary film about the fast food and junk food industries which reveals how children and parents are being fed a bill of goods by food manufacturers. Distributor Radius-TWC has vowed to fight the decision on appeal. The poster featured here shows two M&M’s MPAA logowith the letters F and U next to each other. One wonders if they purposely pushed the envelope knowing that the poster might not pass muster with the MPAA, which cited the key art’s “offensive language.” Nothing like a good controversy to help marketing. Yeah, well, who cares, when the topic is about children’s health in this nation. ”If only Congress and the FDA cared as much about protecting Americans’ lives as the MPAA cares about suppressing our poster, we wouldn’t be facing the greatest health epidemic of our time,” said Radius-TWC co-presidents Tom Quinn and Jason Janego in a statement. The MPAA could not be reached for comment.

The film, which is executive produced by Katie Couric, who also narrates the film, is a Radius/TWC presentation after The Weinstein Company label acquired it this year at Sundance. It features several noteworthy people talking about sugar’s impact on the health of children. Inclmpaa2uded are former President Bill Clinton, Harvard Medical School associate professor in pediatrics Dr. David Ludwig, former FDA commissioner David Kessler, Sen. Tom Harkin, former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona, and food author Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma). One of the producers of Fed Up is Laurie David, who also produced the 2006 Academy Award-winning documentary film An Inconvenient Truth.

Related: Hot Trailer: Food Docu ‘Fed Up’

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Hot Trailer: Docu ‘Fed Up’

By | Wednesday April 9, 2014 @ 2:05pm PDT

Fed Up is described as the film the food industry doesn’t want you to see. Katie Couric narrates the documentary that focuses on the alarming and rising rate of obese children in America. Fed Up was directed by Stephanie Soechtig, and produced by Sarah Olson and Eve Marson. Along with narrating, Couric is exec producer with Laurie David, Regina Scully, Heather Reisman, and Atlas Films’ Michael Walrath and Michelle Walrath. Radius-TWC releases the film wide on May 9. Check out the trailer:

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Sundance: RADIUS-TWC Buys Katie Couric-Narrated Docu ‘Fed Up’

By | Saturday January 25, 2014 @ 6:09pm PST
Mike Fleming

fedupEXCLUSIVE: In a deal that is closing right before the conclusion of the Sundance Film Festival, RADIUS-TWC is acquiring worldwide distribution rights to Fed Up, the Katie Couric-narrated documentary about the alarming and rising rate of obese children in America. Several distributors chased the film, because of its hot button topic that is similar to the embraceable issue examined in Bully. I’ve heard the deal was near $2 million.

Sundance2014_badge__140109214059Fed Up was directed by Stephanie Soechtig, and produced by Sarah Olson and Eve Marson. Along with narrating, Couric is exec producer with Laurie David, Regina Scully, Heather Reisman, and Atlas Films’ Michael Walrath and Michelle Walrath. Deal was negotiated by Cinetic Media on behalf of the filmmakers.

Beyond chronicling the futile efforts of several young people to shed weight, including a 250-pound 15-year old boy and a 212-pound 12-year old girl, the film reveals a 30-year campaign by the food industry, aided by the U.S. government, to mislead and confuse the American public. The result is a humungous health epidemic. The filmmakers trace the historical pattern and places the blame squarely on the food manufacturers that after WWII moved away from natural foods in favor of sugars and processed ingredients as a way to drive profits. As a result, we have a lot of fat kids who develop problems not normally seen in ones … Read More »

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