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DreamWorks Animation Shares Hammered Amid Growing Concerns About 2012

By | Wednesday February 29, 2012 @ 1:30pm PST

The stock closed down 12.2%, to $17.26, after analysts piled on the production company for its soft year-end results, a warning that costs in 2012 will be higher than expected, and broad concerns about the market for animated films. ”Although the studio can control the quality and genre of its movies, it cannot prevent competition in the crowded animation space, or combat 3D fatigue and lofty ticket prices,” says Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter. Janney Capital Markets’ Tony Wible says that DreamWorks Animation’s prospects “look more challenging” in 2012 because it will release just two films instead of three and it’s ”seeing weaker performance on the 2011 carry-over films” — Puss In Boots and Kung Fu Panda 2. Wible lowered his 2012 earnings per share forecast 11.2% to 95 cents, and says the stock is only worth about $13. Susquehanna Financial Group’s Vasily Karasyov is more optimistic — he has a target stock price of $18. But he was jarred by the company’s spending plans to upgrade its production infrastructure, and the talent costs for the upcoming Madagascar 3, which the company says will be $20M higher than they were for the original film. “These largely offset potential benefits of a proven property,” he says. What about DWA’s new joint venture to release films in China? Since the first picture in that deal isn’t due to be released until 2016, “we believe the JV is unlikely to have a material impact on DreamWorks’ earnings near … Read More »

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Wall Street Sours On DreamWorks Animation’s Soft Results And Unanswered Questions

CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg will have to deliver a world class sales pitch soon if he wants to overcome investors’ growing sense that 2012 will be an ogre of a year for the producers of Shrek. The animation studio’s stock hit an all time low in late December when it fell to $16.50. Even so, 22.9% of the shares were controlled by short sellers — people who were betting that the price would continue to drop — according to SNL Kagan. That hasn’t happened yet; DreamWorks Animation closed today at $17.58, which is still -39% over the last 12 months. But analysts don’t see a buying opportunity: This week Goldman Sachs analyst Drew Borst downgraded DreamWorks to “sell.”  He’s disappointed by the estimated $150M domestic box office for last year’s Puss In Boots – which he figures attracted 30% fewer ticket buyers than the average for the previous 13 DreamWorks releases. That probably wasn’t a fluke, he says: The company faces “increased competition at the box office in the kid/family genre” as well as from home entertainment options on cable and online streaming services such as Netflix. Barclays Capital’s Anthony DiClemente also cited weakening trends for home video sales last week when he lowered his 2012 profit estimate by 24.3% to $1.03 a share. He figures Kung Fu Panda 2 sold about 43% fewer DVD and Blu-ray discs than he had forecast. The growing amount of time that kids spend with video games  and tablets, “may be impacting demand for DVDs more acutely than previously thought.” Read More »

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Familiar Field Battles For Best Animated Feature Annie Awards

Mike Fleming

The nominations are out for the 39th annual Annie Awards, which will be awarded February 4 at UCLA’s Royce Hall. Here are the contenders for Best Animated Feature: A Cat In Paris, Arrugas (Wrinkles), Arthur Christmas, Cars 2, Chico & Rita, Kung Fu Panda 2, Puss In Boots, Rango, Rio, and The Adventures Of Tintin. The Annies are put on by the international animated-film society ASIFA-Hollywood and span 28 categories (for the complete list of nominees, click here). “We are really excited about the expanded list of nominations this year,” said Frank Gladstone, president, ASIFA-Hollywood. “All of the major animation studios are represented, as are some of the independent productions from Europe and South America. This certainly is a testament to the wide reach and appeal of animation and the people who create it.” The group also will bestow the Winsor McCay Award to Walt Peregoy, Borge Ring and Robert Searle for career contributions; the June Foray Award to Art Leonardi for significant and benevolent or charitable impact on the art and industry of animation; and a Special Achievement Award to tech company Depth Analysis.

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Game-Maker Zynga Unveils IPO Plans As Investors Grow Wary Of Tech

The maker of popular Facebook games including FarmVille and Mafia Wars says this morning in an SEC filing that it hopes to end up with nearly $890M from a public offering of 100M shares at an expected price of about $9.25 a share. The stock will trade at NASDAQ under the symbol ZNGA. The cash will be used for “general corporate purposes” which could include acquisitions. The company says it also plans to contribute a some of the net proceeds to charitable causes through its philanthropic initiative, Zynga.org. Today’s announcement follows its disclosure this past summer that it planned to go public — seizing on Wall Street’s infatuation with tech companies. Investors have become a little more skeptical about the category, though: For example, Pandora Media is down about 40% since it went public in June. LinkedIn is down 28% since May. And Groupon lost 27% of its market value after it hit the market early last month. Zynga investors also will have no power over the company. Read More »

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Big Media 3Q Corporate Earnings Roundup: Are CEOs Really Worried About Recession? Or Just Looking For Convenient Excuse?

Three months ago, when Big Media CEOs wrapped up their 2Q earnings, they were still relentlessly upbeat about the business. Any worries about the economy? Not then. But the messages they delivered over the past few weeks, as they discussed 3Q, were different. Although they’re still optimistic — remember, they’re paid to be salesmen — now and then you could hear expressions of concern about where things are headed. It stood out when Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman noted that “ad sales growth will face some headwinds.” Other CEOs who are known for speaking bluntly warned that other shocks may bedevil the business. For example, Dish Network Chairman Charlie Ergen said that his satellite company — and others in pay TV — have to fight harder against rising programming costs because “there’s a limit to the price increases that could be passed on to consumers.” Time Warner Cable CEO Glenn Britt warned that premium channels such as HBO, Showtime and Starz “are clearly impacted by the economy as consumers try to cut back.” Either they’re genuinely worried, or they want a scapegoat to blame for things that are going bad, or may soon do so. Whatever the case, we can expect to hear a lot more about the economy when it’s time for the post-mortem on the all-important 4Q earnings.

As for industry performance matters, parents of movie studios had their usual mixed results to brag about or explain away: Time Warner benefitted from Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2. Viacom was up on Transformers: Dark Of The Moon. And News Corp beat its chest about Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes and X-Men: First Class. But Disney’s Cars 2 was no match for last year’s Toy Story 3. Comcast’s Universal Pictures had nothing to compare to last year’s Despicable Me. Lionsgate suffered from Conan The Barbarian and Warrior. And DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 2 didn’t contribute as much in the quarter as Shrek Forever After did in the same period last year.

Over at the TV networks, Comcast’s NBC underperformed the Street’s already modest expectations. Execs at almost all the companies were eager to talk about the cash they expect to collect soon from political ads — as well as their favorite new ATM machines: retransmission consent deals and digital streamers including Amazon, Hulu, and Netflix. Speaking of Netflix, CEO Reed Hastings once again tried to reassure investors that he’s focused on “building back our reputation and brand strength” after his decision in July to slap a 60% price increase on customers who wanted to continue to rent DVDs and stream videos. In 3Q Netflix lost 57.7% of its market value and 800,000 subscribers. And since that customer loss was bigger than projected, Netflix shares continued to fall — they’re now down 67.3% since July 1.

Here are some other themes from the latest earnings reports:

Ad sales: They’s good, but for how long? Most television networks report that scatter prices are comfortably above the upfront market from this past summer. CBS chief Les Moonves says prices in 4Q are up by “mid-teens” on a percentage basis, while Discovery says it sees least high single digit percentages. But Disney’s Bob Iger noted that scatter prices have “slowed slightly these last few weeks.” Kurt Hall of National CineMedia — the leading seller of ads in movie theaters — was far more direct when he spoke to analysts after ratcheting down his company’s financial forecasts. “I’m sure that the broadcast and cable guys are sitting there now counting their lucky stars they got their upfront done before August,” he told analysts. “There’s a lot of uncertainty.” Read More »

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UPDATE: ‘Puss In Boots’ Will Top $33.6M This Weekend, Jeff Katzenberg Predicts

UPDATE, 2:25 PM: DreamWorks Animation shares jumped all over the place in after-hours trading when the company reported its earnings — but settled at -2% as CEO Jeff Katzenberg discussed his expectations and plans. He talked up Puss In Boots, predicting that it will set a record this weekend by generating more than $33.6M at box offices — that’s the previous high for a pre-Halloween release. “Anything beyond that goes into the ‘win’ column,” he says. Much of the revenue will come from sales of high-priced tickets for the 3D version. “Almost every review (of the movie) singled out the quality of the 3D experience,” Katzenberg says. “It’s meaningful.” He provided few details about his recent agreement to offer his films to Netflix instead of HBO in the premium TV window but calls the new arrangement “historic” for DreamWorks as well as “the industry as a whole.” Katzenberg was equally vague about the company’s thoughts about negotiating a new distribution deal to replace the one with Paramount that expires at the end of next year. “We will be considering all our distribution options starting in spring of 2012,” he says adding that he expects to have something in place next summer. Katzenberg says that DreamWorks has paid about $700M in distribution fees for 11 movies that generated $5.5B at worldwide box offices, and $10B from sales in all venues.

Asked about the changes in his employment contract, Lew Coleman … Read More »

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Katzenberg: ‘Hangover 2′ Slashed ‘Kung Fu Panda 2′, But No Comment On Netflix

UPDATE, 2:25 PM: DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg has put away his pom-poms for 3D — and the higher ticket prices he has urged exhibitors to charge for it. He says that DreamWorks Animation will offer 2D versions of its films in addition to 3D because “we remain sensitive to the fact that we’re in a stressed economy bordering on a recession.” He admits that he’s “probably somewhat to blame” for the market’s overly optimistic expectations for 3D. Prospects for the technology are “in flux,” he says. But investors have become too pessimistic. His company’s commitment to 3D represents ”one of the best returns on investment of anything that DreamWorks Animation has done.”

Katzenberg won’t discuss his plan to offer online streaming rights to his films exclusively to Netflix: “We’re going to take a pass and punt on this one today. Lots of gossip and rumors and things going on. I’d prefer to take a no comment on this.” As for Kung Fu Panda 2, the CEO says it was “a terrible, terrible calamity” that the film came out in the U.S. the same week as The Hangover Part II. ”This is the first time we met a buzzsaw,” he said. The competition sliced about $20M from the expected box office sales for the animated film, he says. “It’s heartbreaking because there’s no recovering from it.” But he adds that “nowhere else in the world did this happen to us.” Indeed, while KFP2 “didn’t meet our expectations” domestically, it remains “a solid, profitable film” and “a valuable franchise.”

Nothing to report on DreamWorks’ talks to renew the distribution agreement with Paramount that expires at the end of 2012. Katzenberg says he won’t “answer a question that doesn’t have to be answered yet.” He adds that he’s unfazed by Paramount’s decision to ramp up its animation following its recent release of Rango. That film “had zero impact on us and our relationship with them.” Paramount’s plan “reaffirms the value and appeal of animation.”

DreamWorks shares initially soared more than 7% in after-hours trading. By the end of the analyst call they were up 4.3% over Tuesday’s $21.57 closing price.

PREVIOUS, 1:17 PM: DreamWorks Animation reported 2Q net income of $34.1M, up 42.1% vs the same period last year, on revenues of $218.3M, up 38%. Profits at 40 cents a share matched analysts’ consensus forecast. But the revenue number was higher; the Street expected $197.1M. Read More »

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Why DreamWorks Animation & Netflix Near Exclusive Online Streaming Deal

Netflix reports its earnings and then will talk with Wall Street analysts tonight, and Dreamworks Animation does the same tomorrow. Both might benefit if they can announce a deal that would provide online streaming rights for Dreamworks’ films exclusively to Netflix in the pay TV window. Dreamworks hasn’t been able to cash in on the growing market for digital streaming so far. HBO controls those rights in the pay TV window through 2014. HBO may let DreamWorks out of that agreement early according to Bloomberg which broke the story about the deal with Netflix.

Wall Street is eager to see the details — especially how much Netflix is willing to pay for the Dreamworks rights — to determine whether Netflix “won a (Dreamworks) deal or was the buyer of last resort,” Janney Montgomery Scott analyst Tony Wibble says this morning. Investors also want to know whether the deal diminishes the chance that someone will buy Dreamworks. If HBO is willing to let the company out of its pay TV deal then that would suggest there’s a “low probability” that Time Warner might be interested, Lazard Capital Markets’ Barton Crockett says.

There’s no question that Dreamworks Animation desperately needs an upbeat story to tell. The value of the company’s stock has fallen 28.6% in 2011. Investors are wondering how CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg’s studio will profit from the two films Dreamworks typically releases … Read More »

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Kinetics Asset Mgt Ups Stake in DreamWorks Animation to 10.7%

By | Monday July 11, 2011 @ 10:22am PDT

The New York-based mutual fund founded in 1996 describes itself as an “independently owned and operated investment boutique that adheres to a long-term, contrarian, fundamental value investment philosophy.” DreamWorks Animation seems to fit the bill for contrarians: The stock is down about 30% over the last 12 months even though the S&P 500, a barometer for the overall market, was up more than 20%. Investors have questioned the company’s prospects following disappointing ticket sales for films including Kung Fu Panda 2, and as sales of DVDs have plummeted and movie ticket buyers have lost their enthusiasm for 3D.

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Paramount First Studio This Year To Top $1B At Domestic Box Office

Thanks to the bounty from such films as Transformers: Dark of the Moon, Super 8, ThorRango and Kung Fu Panda 2, Paramount confirmed today that it has crossed the $1 billion mark at the domestic box office for the year. It is the first studio to surpass the milestone — the fifth consecutive year it’s been first. From Jan. 3-July 4, the studio’s overall domestic cume is $1.024 billion. Earlier this month, Paramount Pictures International crossed the $1 billion mark in overseas box office.

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Game Maker Zynga Decides To Play The Market With $1B Public Stock Offering

Zynga, a computer game developer with close ties to DreamWorks Animation, today joined Pandora, LinkedIn, and Bankrate in the parade of companies looking to cash in on Wall Street’s fascination with all things tech. The maker of popular Facebook games including FarmVille and Mafia Wars said in an SEC filing that it wants to raise as much as $1 billion in a public stock offering. With the sale “we hope to enable Zynga to invest more in play than any company in history,” CEO Mark Pincus says in a note to potential shareholders. His board includes DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg. Last month the studio supported Zynga’s first in-game integration with an ad sponsor: Players building cities in the game CityVille could add drive-in movie theaters that played Kung Fu Panda 2.

Zynga says that it turned profitable last year: It had net income of $90.6 million, up from a $52.8 million loss in 2009, on revenues of $597.5 million, up 392%. But the company warns that it’s almost entirely dependant on Facebook which could change its terms with game developers at any time. Although Zynga didn’t disclose how many shares it wants to sell, it says that there will be three classes of common stock with different voting rights so current managers can continue to control the company.

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RealD Effort To Talk Up 3D Leaves Investors Cold As Stock Falls In After Hours Trading

UPDATE, 3:30 PM: Things were fine for RealD, until executives started talking. The company’s stock price initially jumped in after-hours trading following a surprisingly strong earnings report. That would be a welcome change for the company whose stock value has dropped more than 29% since mid-May. But investor sentiment quickly changed about mid-way through CEO Michael Lewis’ briefing where he scoffed at the notion that consumers are fed up with paying higher ticket prices for 3D. The stock price fell to 7.4% below Thursday’s $24.07 closing price. “I don’t think that two films a trend makes,” Lewis said referring specifically to the disappointing 3D sales for Disney’s Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides and DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 2. “I don’t see a trend. It’s a trend until the trend changes to something else.” He added that results for 3D films this year “will be all over the place, but the end result will be a good one.” RealD is especially optimistic about the performance of its screens outside the U.S. The international venues account for 49% of RealD’s locations, but 55% of its gross revenues. Lewis didn’t directly answer a question about whether weakening 3D sales in the U.S. might be an early warning of what will happen overseas. Read More »

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Kagan: ‘Pirates,’ ‘Hangover,’ And ‘Bridesmaids’ Lead The Profit Parade For May

Looks like May wasn’t so bad for movie studios after all. Five of the month’s eight major theatrical releases tracked by SNL Kagan are poised to be profitable. Averaged together, each of the films will generate $464.7 million from theaters, home video, and TV sales. That’s 2.13 times the films’ estimated average cost of $217.7 million — making this the most lucrative May since 2007 when revenues on average were 2.4 times higher than expenses. Since the cost tallies don’t include distribution fees, interest, profit participation and residuals, Kagan figures a film will be profitable if revenues are 1.75 times higher than the estimated expenses.

Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides sailed to the head of the profitability armada. Kagan figures the studio ultimately will see $1.2 billion in revenue, 2.88 times its estimated $421.9 million cost.  Warner Bros’ Hangover Part II follows with expected revenues of $611.4 million vs costs of $213.8 million. The winners list also includes Universal’s Bridesmaids ($311.0 million over $139.6 million in expenses), Paramount’s Thor ($660.7 million over $301.5 million) and DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 2 ($652.3 million over $301.8 million).

Expected losers are TriStar’s Jumping The Broom ($63.4 million vs costs of $66.9 million), Warner Bros’ Something Borrowed ($94.2 million over $135.9 million), and Screen Gems’ Priest ($108.7 million over $160.6 million).

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‘Kung Fu Panda 2′ Kicks Up Anti-3D Sentiment On Wall Street

By | Tuesday May 31, 2011 @ 10:55am PDT

Investors are jumping on the anti-3D bandwagon as the weekend’s lackluster sales of 3D tickets for DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 2 seemed to confirm that audiences are fed up with the higher prices exhibitors are charging for the immersive visual experience. Shares of 3D technology company RealD were down 12% in mid-day trading to $27 — amounting to a 23% decline over the last two weeks. Even with the drop, RealD shares are up nearly 40% from this time last year. Investors appear to be more disenchanted with DreamWorks Animation, which is making all of its films in 3D. Its shares were off 3.3% at midday to about $24 — which is down nearly 20% vs this time last year. 3D tickets accounted for about 45% of Panda‘s domestic box office revenues. By contrast, last year DreamWorks Animation’s Shrek Forever After generated 60% of its opening-weekend revenues from 3D, even though it was on 343 fewer 3D screens, Lazard Capital Markets analyst Barton Crockett notes. Wall Street’s most vocal critic of 3D — BTIG’s Richard Greenfield — reiterated his “sell” recommendation for DreamWorks Animation and lowered his 2011 earnings estimate for the company to $1.54 a share, from $1.81. The company’s movies “have not lived up to expectations and the global DVD market is in a free fall as consumers continue to shift from buying to renting,” he wrote in a report.

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Big Media’s 1Q Earnings Roundup: Cash

The money is flowing again into Big Media. Just about every media CEO who recently spoke to Wall Street analysts about this year’s 1st Quarter earnings said that ad sales are up and consumers are spending. “Viacom has never been stronger financially,” CEO Philippe Dauman crowed. At Disney, where net profits fell slightly, CEO Bob Iger expressed he was “confident in the trends we’re seeing across our segments”. So will these companies do more hiring and give out raises? Don’t be naive. Dauman, for one, told investors that he’s “watching for head count creep” while the company returns $1.9 billion to shareholders over the first 9 months of its fiscal year. Most Big Media companies are buying back their stock, making publicly held shares more valuable. CBS doubled its quarterly dividend to shareholders and Viacom plans to follow suit.

Here are some of the other major themes from this earnings season:

TV Advertising: Network executives were predictably upbeat about what will happen in their upfront ad sales negotiations in coming weeks. Disney CEO Bob Iger predicted the market will be “strong”. NBCUniversal chief Steve Burke upped that to “very strong”. And News Corp COO Chase Carey claimed it’ll be “truly strong”. Their pronouncements made CBS chief Les Moonves sound refreshingly bold when he projected “solid double-digit increases” in ad sales for his broadcast network. Executives cited the price increases they’ve seen in scatter sales as the economy has improved and auto, technology, telecom, … Read More »

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CANNES: 2011 Fest Ready For Its Closeup

Pete Hammond

Just as I hit the ground at the Nice airport today I ran smack into Jude Law, one of the main competition jury members of the 64th edition of the Cannes Film Festival (under President Robert De Niro), and he looked rarin’ to go as he arrived for all the hoopla and non-stop filmgoing over the next 11 days. We’ll see what he feels like after plowing through the 20 competition films as well as those out of competition such as Wednesday night’s opener, Woody Allen’s Midnight In Paris, and the closer, on May 22, Christophe Honore’s 2-hour and 25-minute Les Bien-Aimes (Beloved), the longest of any film in the official competition — competing or not.

Workers were busily attaching huge billboards up on the big Croisette hotels when I cruised the tony neighborhood earlier today, but the world’s second-most-famous red carpet won’t be laid out until midday tomorrow just before Woody, Marion Cotillard, Owen Wilson and the cast of the director’s first French-set film make their way up those famous Palais steps for his love letter to Paree. It was hoped that co-star Carla Bruni, aka Mrs. Nicolas Sarkozy, First Lady of France, would be coming too, but I heard she’s not making the trip after all and neither is her husband. C’est La Vie.

Up and down the Croisette you are bombarded as usual by Hollywood product being hyped on any available space. The new Transformers film from that auteur (NOT) Michael Bay got the hot spot at the Carlton entrance right next to a display for Disney/Pixar’s  Cars 2 on one side and Cowboys and Aliens on the other. Lording over them, though, are The Smurfs and all of those Pirates of the Caribbean, which plans to make a huge splash here Saturday as the prime-time film on one of the key nights of the fest. Star power will be in force, of course, with Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz driving the paparazzi wild, which is just what Disney wants for its global launch of the film that premiered last week at Disneyland and makes another stop in Moscow before hitting the Cote d’Azur. Cannes, though a serious-minded haven for cineastes, doesn’t mind the attention either. Read More »

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DreamWorks Animation Pins Hopes On ‘Kung Fu Panda 2′ After 1Q Earnings Fall Short

UPDATE, 2:30 PM: Don’t look for DreamWorks Animation to produce additional movie genre parodies similar to its send up of mob films in Shark Tale, monster movies in Monsters vs. Aliens, and superhero films in Megamind. “All shared an approach and tone and idea of parody, and did not travel well internationally,” CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg told analysts in a conference call after earnings were announced. “We don’t have anything like that coming on our schedule now.” Also in the call, Katzenberg forcefully endorsed Netflix’s growing effort to buy the rights to stream movies and TV shows on the Web. “It has put another buyer in the marketplace, and an aggressive one,” Katzenberg says. “I know for sure it’s good news.” But he refused to take sides on the debate over Premium VOD, saying it’s “not relevant to us today.” He also wouldn’t discuss his company’s plans to negotiate a distribution deal to replace the one with Paramount that expires next year.
PREVIOUSLY, 1:42 PM: Everyone knew that the first part of this year would look disappointing for DreamWorks Animation’s earnings. It didn’t have anything  to generate the toy and licensing sales it saw last year with How To Train Your Dragon. Still, DWA’s earnings fell short of analyst estimates for the first quarter. The company reported net earnings of $8.8 million, down 59.4% from the same period last year, … Read More »

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Super Bowl XLV: Game Day For Movie Ads

Universal, Disney, Paramount, and Sony have all bought time for Super Bowl Sunday on Fox which is selling a 30-second commercial for a whopping $3 million this year (up from $2.8 million in 2010). Many more films will be advertised on this most-watched TV event compared with last year but once again Warner Bros won’t join the crowd. Studios often keep secret what specific films they will promo on Game Day, but I have the rundown:

Paramount is promo’ing the most movies, servicing all at halftime: Gore Verbinski/Johnny Depp’s Rango, DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 2, Marvel’s Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger, JJ Abrams’ Super 8, and Michael Bay’s Transformers 3: Dark Of The Moon.

Disney will feature one ad during the game’s 3rd quarter: Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.

Sony’s ads will run during pre-game, not during the game: Priest, Just Go With It, and Battle: Los Angeles.

Universal and DreamWorks didn’t even wait for the game: they released their Super Bowl ad an hour ahead of the scheduled time for Jon Favreau’s Cowboys & Aliens starring Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford. Uni also had a 1st quarter ad for Vin Diesel’s Fast Five, the latest in the Fast & Furious franchise.

Twentieth Century Fox will make Super Bowl history this Sunday when a 30-second spot for its 3D toon Rio (April 15) airs during the game’s 4th quarter and becomes the first ad to air during the game with an embedded code tied to the ”Angry Birds” mobile game. During the spot, viewers will be invited … Read More »

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Hot Trailer: ‘Kung Fu Panda 2′

By | Tuesday November 9, 2010 @ 6:52am PST
Mike Fleming

Jack Black, just seen in trailer form as the star of 20th Century Fox’s Gulliver’s Travels, lends his voice once again to Kung Fu Panda 2: The Kaboom of Doom, which DreamWorks Animation releases through Paramount Pictures May 26, 2011.

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