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Miramax Joins Parade Of Studios Providing Movies To Netflix In UK And Ireland

This is the latest in a recent series of Netflix deals to secure movies to stream in the UK and Ireland. But this release doesn’t say that the Miramax agreement is exclusive, a contrast to the announcements with Lionsgate and MGM.

BEVERLY HILLS and SANTA MONICA, CA – November 16, 2011 – Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) and Miramax today announced a new multi-year digital licensing agreement that will bring a broad range of acclaimed Miramax films to Netflix members in the UK and Ireland.

Beginning in early 2012, Miramax titles will be available for Netflix members to watch instantly in the UK and Ireland streamed over the Internet to connected TVs, tablets, game consoles, computers and mobile phones.

Financial terms of the deal are not being disclosed. Netflix announced in October that it would launch its service in the UK and Ireland early in 2012.

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UPDATE: Starz Looks For A Premium Streaming Service To Replace Netflix

UPDATE, 12: 00 PM: No word from Starz execs about when they might announce a digital streaming deal to replace the one with Netflix, which expires in February. “There are a lot of conversations going on,” Starz CEO Chris Albrecht told analysts today. “It’s a road that needs to be evaluated almost on a weekly basis.” The company hopes to license programs from its premium channel to a premium-priced streaming service – meaning, one that charges more than Netflix. As more companies enter the online video market “they’ll begin to segment and differentiate,” says Liberty Media CEO Greg Maffei. “That’s something we would embrace.” Albrecht said that “we didn’t believe it was appropriate to have our products included in a low-cost service.” Do they really expect lots of consumers to pay high prices in this weak economy — especially with the anemic numbers cable and satellite companies are posting for premium channels? At Starz the 3Q sub figure was Read More »

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Disney-ABC Strikes New Streaming Deals With Netflix And Amazon

Disney’s announcement with Netflix this morning extends and expands a current deal, giving the streaming service rights to several shows 30 days after the last episode of the season airs. The one with Amazon is new and includes more than 800 library episodes. Both include prior seasons of Grey’s Anatomy and all episodes of Lost. They also both landed ABC Family’s The Secret Life Of The American Teenager and Phineas and Ferb. Beyond that there are a lot of differences, with Amazon landing prior seasons of Marvel’s animated shows including X-Men Evolution and Netflix getting ABC Studios’ Army Wives. Here’s the release for Netflix:

BEVERLY HILLS and BURBANK, Calif., Oct. 31, 2011 — Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) and Disney-ABC Television Group today announced that they recently entered into an extension of their previous existing licensing agreement. The extension allows Netflix to continue to stream hundreds of library episodes from ABC Studios, Disney Channel and ABC Family over the Internet. As part of the deal, Netflix is also adding new content to its lineup of Disney-ABC series and TV movies.

The agreement adds to the growing selection of content that can be streamed from Netflix in the United States. Episodes from new seasons of current Disney-ABC series will be made available to Netflix 30-days after the last episode of each season airs. Among the series and TV movies extended as part of the deal include:

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Spin Cycle: Who Says Netflix Is Paying DreamWorks Animation $30M Per Picture?

Something always seems to be a little weird when Netflix announces big news about itself — and today’s unveiling of its streaming deal with DreamWorks Animation is no exception. The news appeared to have been handed to The New York Times; it had the first story as well as interviews with executives from both companies. But that’s not the problem: What’s curious is why The Times felt confident enough to say that unnamed “analysts estimate (the deal) is worth $30 million per picture to DreamWorks.” Although there were no details to support that estimate, it quickly became perceived as a fact. For example, a Reuters story stated that the deal is “worth $30 million per picture to DreamWorks over a number of years.” If that’s true, then it’s a big deal; HBO currently pays the studio about $20M per picture. If the $30M figure for the Netflix deal is accurate, then Caris & Co analyst David Miller says his 2013 earnings estimate for DreamWorks “would therefore improve from $1.58 (per share) to $1.70.”

OK, so is it true? The companies don’t say: Many hours after the Times story ran, Netflix and DreamWorks jointly filed a press release that said “financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.” But some analysts find the $30M figure hard to believe. Susquehana Financial Group’s Vasily Karasyov writes this morning that “we would be surprised if the terms for (DreamWorks Animation) are more favorable than those of their current deal with HBO. We think the change in pay TV partners was due to HBO shifting away from animation and not because (Netflix) offered significantly superior terms.” Janney Capital Markets’ Tony Wible also says that “it appears (DreamWorks) was kicked out of HBO and that (Netflix) was the buyer of last resort.” Read More »

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Why DreamWorks Animation & Netflix Near Exclusive Online Streaming Deal

Netflix reports its earnings and then will talk with Wall Street analysts tonight, and Dreamworks Animation does the same tomorrow. Both might benefit if they can announce a deal that would provide online streaming rights for Dreamworks’ films exclusively to Netflix in the pay TV window. Dreamworks hasn’t been able to cash in on the growing market for digital streaming so far. HBO controls those rights in the pay TV window through 2014. HBO may let DreamWorks out of that agreement early according to Bloomberg which broke the story about the deal with Netflix.

Wall Street is eager to see the details — especially how much Netflix is willing to pay for the Dreamworks rights — to determine whether Netflix “won a (Dreamworks) deal or was the buyer of last resort,” Janney Montgomery Scott analyst Tony Wibble says this morning. Investors also want to know whether the deal diminishes the chance that someone will buy Dreamworks. If HBO is willing to let the company out of its pay TV deal then that would suggest there’s a “low probability” that Time Warner might be interested, Lazard Capital Markets’ Barton Crockett says.

There’s no question that Dreamworks Animation desperately needs an upbeat story to tell. The value of the company’s stock has fallen 28.6% in 2011. Investors are wondering how CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg’s studio will profit from the two films Dreamworks typically releases … Read More »

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Netflix Exec Says Wall Street Fanned Hollywood ‘Paranoia’, But Now Studios ‘Are Coming To Us’

If Netflix’s efforts to acquire content for its Web streaming service was a baseball game, then it would be in the 5th inning for securing TV shows and in the 8th for movies — although there’s a chance to start a new match there around 2013 — CFO David Wells told an investor group on Wednesday. Hollywood studios are less fearful of Netflix than they were in 2009 and 2010. “Wall Street probably had a part in amping the paranoia of doing deals,” Wells told the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Technology Conference. But now studios are willing to experiment, and “it means people are coming to us with deals.” Opportunities may increase in a few years as studio commitments to premium channels such as HBO and Starz expire. For example, he says that Netflix would consider doing a deal directly with Disney or Sony in mid-2015 if they’re unhappy with the terms that Starz offers them to stream their films. Wells says that studios “would love for us to have a competitor” to bid up prices for movies and TV shows — and Netflix considers Amazon, Google, and Apple likely candidates to play that role. “They’re well capitalized and consumer-centric,” he says. Years from now he says that cable and satellite companies could join the fray by introducing their own Internet streaming services. “It will make for good sport down the road on the content side,” Wells says. Read More »

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TOLDJA! EPIX-Netflix Online Streaming Deal

2ND UPDATE: Deal is done. See news release below.

UPDATE: I’ve learned that as soon as tomorrow there’ll be a news release about EPIX giving Netflix exclusive online rights to films from its partners — Paramount, Lionsgate, and MGM — for the next 5 years in exchange with $1 billion in licensing fees. Of course, who knows what those 5 years will bring in terms of product? Paramount has been self-financing its limited product and mostly distributing pics, Lionsgate is fighting a hostile takeover, and MGM is a corpse waiting for an afterlife. But all Netflix seems to care about these days is supposedly shaking up the pay channel world with exclusive online streaming deals like the recent one with Relativity Media. And who knows what shape Ryan Kavanaugh’s company will be in a few years.

NEW YORK and BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., August 10, 2010 – EPIX™ and Netflix, Inc. [Nasdaq: NFLX] today announced an agreement through which Netflix members can instantly watch an array of new releases and library titles from EPIX streamed over the Internet from Netflix. Movies from the multi-year deal will begin streaming from Netflix on September 1 and include movies from Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM.

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