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Bruce Norris’ ‘The Qualms’ Pam MacKinnon At Helm, Rounds Out Playwrights Horizons Season

By | Friday July 11, 2014 @ 9:59am PDT

Bruce Norris’ ‘The Qualms’ Pam MacKinnon At Helm, Rounds Out Playwrights Horizons SeasonBruce Norris, whose Clybourne Park won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, returns to Playwrights Horizons next spring with The Qualms, which opens Sunday (July 13) at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre Company. The New York edition will begin previews May 22, 2015 at the off-Broadway nonprofit. Director of both is the very busy Pam MacKinnon, also on board with the upcoming all-star Broadway revival of Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance marqueed by Glenn Close, John Lithgow and Lindsay Duncan.

Steppenwolf describes the play this way: “At a beachside apartment complex, a group of friends gathers for their regular evening of food, drink, drugs and partner-swapping. When Chris and Kristy attempt to become the newest members, the evening does not go as planned. The artichoke dip grows cold as the party devolves into a territorial battle over mating privileges. Does sex ruin everything? And what is the purpose of monogamy? Bruce Norris’s comedy explores the eternal struggle for power, status and getting laid.”

The 67th Annual Tony Awards - Press RoomMacKinnon has fast become one of Broadway’s go-to directors while also being a Steppenwolf mainstay: her extraordinary revival of Albee’s Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? was a Broadway transfer from the Chicago company, where she also staged Clybourne Park (which had its debut at Playwrights).

The Playwrights production of The Qualms is not a co-production with Steppenwolf, per a a company spokesman, and casting, along with the rest of the creative team, will be announced at a late date.

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ABC News Backhands Print Partner Over Pulitzer Prize Credits

By | Wednesday April 16, 2014 @ 5:02pm PDT

LisaColumn__131015210634-275x198Weekly Column: Few things in this world are more painful than the realization that an estrangement has occurred between two news organizations who had worked amiably together investigating doctors and lawyers squashing benefits claims of miners dying of black lung, at the behest of the coal industry. That is just what has happened after the Center for Public Integrity won a Pulitzer Prize this week for an investigation into this medical travesty, after other organizations had jointly awarded SHERWOOD-articleLargeCPI and ABC News for the report. ABC claims CPI threw its staffers under the bus to soak up all the Pulitzer glory; CPI claims ABC News doesn’t deserve to share the Pulitzer because it only parachuted in periodically on the lengthy investigation, produced “sporadic” reports for television — not print — and repeatedly had to be saved from making embarrassing factual errors on its broadcast segments about the investigation.

Related: Pulitzer Board Honors The Guardian And Washington Post For Snowden Coverage

Meanwhile, White House Correspondents Dinner organizers took on the air of folks being pushed towards dangerous machinery in which they would prefer not to become entangled. That group already has announced it is giving its Edgar A. Poe Award to CPI and ABC News for the black-lung report, specifically because the two organizations “showed how a true collaboration between media partners can break significant new ground on an already well-reported story.” Joel McHale, who’s been booked to provide comedy at that annual black-tie dinner/celebrity petting zoo, is going to have a hard time topping that one for laughs.

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Pulitzer Prize Board Honors The Guardian And The Washington Post For Snowden Coverage

By | Monday April 14, 2014 @ 12:13pm PDT

Pulitzer PrizeThe big question today was whether the Pulitzer Prize board would support the papers that published Edward Snowden‘s revelations about the National Security Agency’s widespread secret surveillance — which former Vice President Dick Cheney said made him a “traitor.” And the organization did, giving The Guardian and The Washington Post the Public Service award. The Guardian helped to “spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy,” the board said, while the Post “helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.”

In the letters and drama prizes: Donna Tartt won the fiction prize for her coming-of-age novel The Goldfinch. The drama award went to Annie Baker’s The Flick, about three employees of a Massachusetts art house movie theater. The biography award went to Megan Marshall’s Margaret Fuller: A New American Life. In general non-fiction, Dan Fagin won for Toms River: A Story Of Science And Salvation, an examination of the links between local water and air pollution and childhood cancers. Read More »

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