National Film Registry List: ‘Pulp Fiction’, ‘Mary Poppins’, ‘Magnificent Seven’, More

By | Wednesday December 18, 2013 @ 12:12am PST

magnificent sevenThe Library of Congress has unveiled its annual list of 25 films that will join the National Film Registry. The movies are culled from the period 1919-2002 and include classics like Rita Hayworth-starrer Gilda; sci-fi pic Forbidden Planet; western The Magnificent Seven; war drama Judgment At Nuremberg; Mary Poppins (fitting in a year where Gilda_trailer_hayworth1Saving Mr Banks, the story of that film’s genesis, is playing in movie theaters); astronaut epic The Right Stuff; Michael Moore’s Roger & Me; and Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction. Each of the 25 films will be preserved as cinematic treasures for generations to come. “The National Film Registry stands among the finest summations of more than a century of extraordinary American cinema,” said Librarian of Congress, James H Billington. “This key component of American cultural history, however, is endangered, so we must protect the nation’s matchless film heritage and cinematic creativity.” There are also some silent films on the list including Daughter Of Dawn, featuring an all-Native-American cast; 1919′s A Virtuous Vamp, starring Constance Talmadge; and 1926′s Ella Cinders. Earlier this month, the Library of Congress released a survey that found that 70% of American silent movies have been lost. In all, this year’s additions bring the number of films in the registry to 625. The complete 2013 list is below:

Bless Their Little Hearts (1984)
Part of the vibrant New Wave of independent African-American filmmakers to emerge in the 1970s and 1980s, Billy Woodberry became a key figure in the movement known as the L.A. Renaissance. Woodberry crafted his UCLA thesis film, “Bless Their Little Hearts,” which was theatrically released in 1984. The film features a script and cinematography by Charles Burnett. This spare, emotionally resonant portrait of family life during times of struggle blends grinding, daily-life sadness with scenes of deft humor. Jim Ridley of the “Village Voice” aptly summed up the film’s understated-but- real virtues: “Its poetry lies in the exaltation of ordinary detail.”

Brandy in the Wilderness (1969)
This introspective “contrived diary” film by Stanton Kaye features vignettes from the relationship of a real-life couple, in this case the director and his girlfriend. An evocative 1960s time capsule—reminiscent of Jim McBride’s “David Holzman’s Diary”—this simulated autobiography, as in many experimental films, often blurs the lines between reality and illusion, moving in non-linear arcs through the ever-evolving and unpredictable interactions of relationships, time and place. As Paul Schrader notes, “it is probably quite impossible (and useless) to make a distinction between the point at which the film reflects their lives, and the point at which their lives reflect the film.” “Brandy in the Wilderness” remains a little-known yet key work of American indie filmmaking.

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Harrison Ford, Sam Jackson, More Set For 2013 AFI Night At The Movies

By | Tuesday April 9, 2013 @ 11:30am PDT

Target Presents AFI Night at the Movies screens a dozen classic films with stars in attendance on one night, Wednesday April 24. This year’s line-up includes Cher in person presenting Moonstruck, Harrison Ford presenting Blade Runner: The Final Cut, and Samuel L. Jackson screening Pulp Fiction. Tickets go on sale on April 11. All screenings take place at the Arclight Hollywood. Here’s the full slate of confirmed films and special guests:

Kathy Bates presenting Misery (1990)
Cher presenting Moonstruck (1987)
Sally Field presenting Norma Rae (1979)
Peter Fonda presenting Easy Rider (1969)
Harrison Ford presenting Blade Runner: The Final Cut
Samuel L. Jackson presenting Pulp Fiction (1994)
Shirley MacLaine presenting Terms Of Endearment (1983)
Demi Moore presenting Ghost (1990)
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Samuel L. Jackson Lets Loose On ‘Django’, Tarantino, Slavery, Oscars And Golden Globes – Interview

Pete Hammond

With a filmography that includes roles in some of the highest-grossing movies of all time including The Avengers, Iron Man and the Star Wars series Samuel L. Jackson clearly knows how to pick ‘em. And that is entirely intentional. … Read More »

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Miramax, U.K.’s Sky Enter Exclusive, Multi-Year Library Deal

By | Monday June 18, 2012 @ 12:43am PDT

LONDON and SANTA MONICA, June 18, 2012 – Leading global film and television studio Miramax and BSkyB (Sky), the most comprehensive multichannel, multi-platform television service in the UK and Ireland, today announced the completion of a new licensing deal.

Under the terms of the agreement, Sky will hold exclusive rights to a substantial package of Miramax films including Academy Award® winning Life is Beautiful, Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, Spy Kids, and Starsky & Hutch among others. These titles will be delivered across the range of Sky Movies subscription channels in high definition (HD), through Sky’s on-demand service Sky Anytime+ and on the move via Sky Go.

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R.I.P. Sally Menke

By | Tuesday September 28, 2010 @ 10:52am PDT
Nellie Andreeva

Film editor Sally Menke, who edited most of Quentin Tarantino’s movies, was found dead this morning this morning in the Beachwood Canyon area of the Hollywood Hills a day after she was reported missing when she didn’t come home after a … Read More »

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Mike Sitrick, Shame On You…

By | Thursday July 12, 2007 @ 5:31pm PDT

sitrick.jpgI’ve known Mike Sitrick for a long time. He’s a PR maven who prides himself on being a family man. Which is why he should be filled with self-loathing for allowing his firm to promote a torture porn pic like Captivity, … Read More »

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