Global Showbiz Briefs: Prix Louis Delluc To ‘Blue Is The Warmest Color’; Sergio Leone Heirs Launch Leone Film Group IPO; More

‘Blue Is The Warmest Color’ Nabs France’s Prix Louis Delluc
Blue Is the Warmest ColorFrance’s prestigious Prix Louis Delluc has gone to Blue Is The Warmest Color. The Cannes Palme d’Or winner directed by Abdellatif Kechiche is famously not France’s Oscar entry this year due to the timing of its release, but just nabbed a Golden Globe nomination and has an Indie Spirit nom as well as a handful of critics’ prizes. Cannes President Gilles Jacob oversees the jury for the Delluc award, which was established in 1937. Last year’s winner was Benoit Jacquot’s Farewell, My Queen. The best first film Delluc went this year to Vandal by Hélier Cisterne.

Sergio Leone Estate Launching IPO Of Leone Film Group
alamogoodbadugly_8The heirs of spaghetti Western maestro Sergio Leone are planning an IPO of the Leone Film Group to kick off Wednesday. The company is eyeing a listing on Milan’s small-cap market and, according to The Wall Street Journal, is hoping to raise about €17M with a sale of a 20% stake. The move is designed to help expand the company’s 400-title film library, its own production output and to sign more distribution agreements with U.S. filmmakers. The group has a deal with DreamWorks and also has picked up such recent titles as Ron Howard’s Rush and Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf Of Wall Street. Leone’s heirs, Andrea and Raffaella, are also looking to pitch their father’s brand to a younger audience. The pair has bought back rights to most of Leone’s movies and is now looking to make deals for spaghetti western-style areas in U.S. theme parks, the Journal report says. Read More »

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CAA Signs Noomi Rapace

By | Monday August 5, 2013 @ 5:34pm PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: CAA today signed Noomi Rapace, the Swedish star whose breakout came in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and subsequent installments of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy. Rapace recently left UTA, and while she was expected to come … Read More »

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Rooney Mara Signs With Management 360

By | Thursday June 6, 2013 @ 12:39pm PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: Management 360 has signed Rooney Mara, who is coming into her own after breakout turns in The Social Network and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Mara continues to be repped by WME. She followed those … Read More »

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‘A Royal Affair’s Nikolaj Arcel To Direct DreamWorks’ Redo Of Hitchcock’s ‘Rebecca’

Mike Fleming

RebeccaEXCLUSIVE: Dreamworks has set Nikolaj Arcel to direct Rebecca, a remake of the 1940 Alfred Hitchcock film. The picture, which has a script draft by Eastern Promises scribe Steven Knight, is being produced by Working Title … Read More »

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NY Film Critics Circle Pushes Back Awards Vote To December 3

By | Tuesday October 16, 2012 @ 8:15am PDT
Mike Fleming

Last year, the New York Film Critics Circle moved out ahead of the film critics awards pack by doling out their awards on November 28. It was a controversial move, jumping the National Board Of Review and the Los … Read More »

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New ‘Dragon Tattoo’ DVD Is Real, Really

Sony The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo DVDThis is sure to be generating some high-fives over at Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. In a nice marketing touch, the DVD for Columbia Pictures’ David Fincher-directed The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo that … Read More »

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MGM Takes A Loss On ‘Dragon Tattoo’ And Seeks Better Terms For Sequels

If you think that The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was a hit, then talk to MGM Holdings CEO Gary Barber. His company co-financed the film, and although it has generated about $231M at worldwide box offices he tells investors who own MGM’s unlisted shares that “it is below our expectations and we booked a modest loss.” The company wouldn’t say how much it wrote down, but Barber notes that execs ”were hoping we’d do 10% more than we did.” MGM has an option to co-finance the other two films in the trilogy and is talking to Sony about following through “assuming we can achieve better economics.” He was much more upbeat about the early performance of 21 Jump Street, which MGM also co-financed. “We expect it to be profitable,” Barber says. He adds that ”MGM has entered 2012 as a revitalized company.” He declined to describe MGM’s strategy but says it is “evaluating all options.” Read More »

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Noomi Rapace Lands At WME After UTA Exit

By | Tuesday March 20, 2012 @ 8:57pm PDT

Noomi Rapace AgencyTUESDAY UPDATE: WME’s Adam Isaacs, Dave Wirtschafter, and Brandt Joel signed Noomi Rapace who stars in Prometheus on June 8th. Now the actress should leave her management Magnolia Entertainment.

MARCH 13TH EXCLUSIVE: The original Girl With the Dragon Tattoo Noomi Rapace has left UTA, according to rival agencies. When UTA freshly signed her after starring in the Swedish movie trilogy based on the Stieg Larsson crime novels, she immediately drew interest from all corners — directors, producers and studio production execsRead More »

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CBS Pilot ‘Quean’ Not Going Forward After Sony Threatens Legal Action Over Alleged ‘Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’ Similarities

By | Monday March 5, 2012 @ 9:15am PST
Nellie Andreeva

EXCLUSIVE: CBS’ drama pilot Quean has become the victim of a legal standoff between two media congloms. I have learned that Warner Bros TV, which produces the project with Joel Silver’s Silver Pictures, yesterday decided to pull the plug upon the advice of an outside legal firm.

When it was announced, Quean, written by The L Word creator Ilene Chaiken, sounded like a typical CBS procedural: It centers on an edgy and independent Millennial hacker girl who teams up with an Oakland police detective to solve crimes. The pilot secured Jaume Collet-Serra as director and was moving to the casting stage when Warner Bros. TV received a letter from Sony Pictures threatening a lawsuit over alleged similarities to The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, which Sony has the rights to and is adapting as a movie trilogy. (The first movie, directed by David Fincher, was released last year; the other two have been greenlighted).

Chaiken proceeded with an extensive p.1 rewrite of the pilot, changing most key plot elements, including the lead’s employer from a PI to a law firm, her boss from a white male private investigator to a black female lawyer, and the protagonist herself from a loner to a girl with a boyfriend. I hear CBS brass got the rewrite on Saturday and liked it. But it was also sent by Warner Bros TV to an outside law firm retained for the case. With Sony still threatening legal action, the firm recommended that the project doesn’t go forward over one major similarity: the lead character being a hacker. And yesterday, Warner Bros pulled the plug. Read More »

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Costume Designers Guild Awards: ‘Dragon Tattoo’, ‘W.E.’, ‘Harry Potter’, ‘Glee’, ‘Boardwalk Empire’, ‘Downton Abbey’

By | Tuesday February 21, 2012 @ 11:18pm PST

LOS ANGELES, CA — February 21, 2012 – The winners of the 14th Annual Costume Designers Guild Awards were announced tonight at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The event was hosted by actress, Jane Lynch. The Guild handed out competitive

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Oscars Q&A: Rooney Mara On The Girl Who Would Be Lisbeth Salander

By | Sunday February 12, 2012 @ 9:11am PST

Lisbeth Salander, misanthropic Watson to Mikael Blomkvist’s investigative journalist Sherlock Holmes in Stieg Larsson’s novel The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, is by nature a rule-breaker. Look no further than her day job as a hacker; a means of assaulting … Read More »

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Art Directors Guild Winners: ‘Hugo’, ‘Harry Potter’, ‘Dragon Tattoo’, ‘Boardwalk Empire’

Hugo, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2 and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo took the Art Directors Guild Awards for period, fantasy and contemporary movies tonight in ceremonies hosted by Paula Poundstone at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

Production Designer Tony Walton received the Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Hall of Fame inductees were Robert Boyle, William Darling, and Alfred Junge. Teams from the Harry Potter films were recognized for Outstanding Contribution to Cinematic Imagery: Executive Producer David Heyman, Producer David Barron; directors Christopher Columbus, Alfonso Cuaron, Mike Newell, and David Yates; creator and author J.K. Rowling; screenwriters Steve Kloves and Michael Goldenberg; production designer Stuart Craig; art director Neil Lamont and set decorator Stephenie McMillan.

The Guild also screened two short films by Cindy Peters. The first was a behind-the-scenes look at preparations for the show. The second, 75 Years of Inspirational Design: A Personal Reflection in Eight Chapters featured production designers Albert Brenner, Terry Marsh, James D. Bissell, Jeannine Oppewall, Rick Carter, Rick Heinrichs, Roy Christopher and Guy Hendrix Dyas. The ceremonies were produced by Tom Wilkins and Greg Grande. Full list of winners follows:

FEATURE FILM

Period Film
HUGO Production Designer: Dante Ferretti

Fantasy Film

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY
HALLOWS PART 2 Production Designer: Stuart Craig

Contemporary Film

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO Production Designer: Donald Graham Burt

TELEVISION

One-Hour Single Camera Television Series
BOARDWALK EMPIRE

Television Movie or Mini-Series
MILDRED PIERCE Production Designer: Mark Friedberg

Episode of a Half Hour Single-Camera Television Series
MODERN FAMILY
Episode: Express Christmas – Production Designer: Richard Berg

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Rooney Mara Takes Lead In Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Side Effects’

Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: In her first lead role since her Oscar-nominated turn in The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, Rooney Mara has just committed to starring in Side Effects, the Steven Soderbergh-directed thriller. Mara will replace Blake Lively in a film that … Read More »

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OSCARS: Producer Scott Rudin Talks Critics Awards, Salander, His ‘Jeopardy’ Discovery And Why A Non-Baseball Fan Relates To ‘Moneyball’

Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: We are in the thick of the awards season, a time of year when at least one film produced by Scott Rudin is usually in the conversation. Last year, he was producer of two Best Picture nominees, The Social Network and True Grit. This year, he’s got three in the mix. There’s Moneyball, the 9/11-themed Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close and The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. All this happened in a year when Rudin closed his Hollywood office and formally moved his producing deal to Sony Pictures (where he produced The Social Network and joined producers Michael De Luca, Rachael Horovitz and Brad Pitt in reconfiguring Moneyball). None of that impeded his output and when Rudin took time out for Deadline and what will likely be his only Oscar season Q&A, he pulled himself away from new films he’s making with the Coen Brothers, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach. That is a lot of activity for any producer — and Rudin separately generates as many Broadway shows as he does films — but it’s a pace the New York-based producer is comfortable handling.

AWARDSLINE: Much was written about The New Yorker reviewer David Denby breaking an embargo that New York film critic voters agreed to abide by when they saw The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo for the purposes of voting for their annual awards. Now, he wrote a positive review…
RUDIN: That wasn’t the issue.

AWARDSLINE: Why did it trouble you so much?
RUDIN: Because you want reviews timed to the release of the movie when they can sell tickets. Having reviews break earlier…I mean, our campaign is calibrated very carefully around closing the campaign with the release of the film. You want reviews to cume the week the movie’s opening and not a month before when they do you absolutely no good. What also concerned me was if he broke the embargo there was a decent chance other people would. It turned out that other people felt such scorn for him that nobody else did, which was kind of remarkable.

AWARDSLINE: Was it more about giving your word and not keeping it?
RUDIN: Keep your word or don’t come to the movie. It’s totally fine to say I’m not going to honor a review embargo, but you have to give me and the studio the right to say, don’t come see it. You don’t put in writing a commitment not to review until a certain date and then review it anyway because you don’t want to write about other movies that you don’t think are serious enough for you. It’s incredibly disingenuous.

AWARDSLINE: All this happened because the New York film critics moved up their deadline two weeks to be first. How valid are these lists when a late entry like Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close aren’t even considered?
RUDIN: I can only answer in relation to my stuff. I mean, in the case of the New York critics, they set a deadline that was literally a day ahead of when we would be able to screen Dragon Tattoo. We were perfectly fine not screening for them, but they came to us and said they wanted to move the date by a day to include us. Because we had won it last year on Social Network, we felt we kind of owed it to them. It seemed churlish not to let them see the movie if they moved the date. We didn’t ask them to move the date; they came to us. And then I got a bunch of nasty emails from John Anderson saying, why didn’t you ask us to move the date on Extremely Loud? The whole thing seemed so ridiculous. They were all trying to get ahead of each other. Honestly, I don’t think it has hurt Extremely Loud one iota not to have been seen by the couple of groups that didn’t see it. In the end, it’s all opinion anyway. It’s great when you win those things but not great enough that you wouldn’t finish a movie well. Those critics awards come and go every year, but the finished movie is your work. I would love to have finished Extremely Loud two weeks earlier and screened it for everybody. It just wasn’t done. And the same was true with Dragon Tattoo. These were big ambitious movies that were on very very tight finishing schedules and we just couldn’t do it.

AWARDSLINE: The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo deal seemed to take forever. It was obviously complicated by the fact that Stieg Larsson had passed away. What was the biggest challenge for you in pulling the rights together on the series?
RUDIN: The big issue on it was that the book was still growing in popularity, so it was hard to figure out, honestly, what a fair deal was. We’d start to make it a deal, you’d turn around and the book has sold 5 million more copies and suddenly it’s worth more. It just took a long time.

AWARDSLINE: How long?
RUDIN: Almost a year and a half. When we started to negotiate we didn’t know there were Swedish movies. Nobody told us, I had no idea. Honestly, we started out buying movie rights and it turned out we were buying remake rights. We got way down the road before anybody said, “Oh, by the way, these were made.”

AWARDSLINE: Did that make you think twice?
RUDIN: No. I think the first one especially was good and entertaining. But Amy Pascal and Michael Lynton and I felt like Lisbeth is such an astonishing character, she could go as long as you wanted her to go. So, making it a big superstar director version of it always felt like a great idea and that a Swedish language version wasn’t going to hurt it all. In fact, would probably help it. Read More »

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Sony Going Ahead With ‘Dragon Tattoo’ Sequels Despite Underperforming Box Office

UPDATE: Sony Pictures is not known for risky moves. So all through the holidays rival studio execs were predicting that Amy Pascal et al would not go forward with the 2nd and 3rd film installments of Stieg Larsson’s bestselling Millennium trilogy The Girl Who Played With Fire and The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets’ Nest. That opinion was based on the mediocre opening for The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Sure its domestic debut was significantly behind M:I4 and Sherlock 2, but it’s R-rated and both of those are PG-13. Then overseas grosses, expected to be huge, began trickling in underwhelming. GWDT opened only 3rd in the UK, and disappointing in Asia, and “not as good as hoped for” in Sweden, Denmark, and Finland. Now I’ve learned that Sony Pictures is indeed going forward with The Girl Who Played With Fire already written by Steve Zaillian, and The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets’ Nest which Zaillian is penning. Studio chief Pascal and producer Scott Rudin have not yet locked in David Fincher as director. But they’re looking to start shooting #2 by the end of this year/beginning of next. Overseas, Sony now expects GWDT to do over $200M — so $300M all in globally. “And that’s a really good number,” the Sony exec told me hopefully. But one mogul counters, “The surprising part is that Sony is not waiting to see if the movie works overseas before going forward with the sequels. I would have.” Read More »

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‘MI:4′ Among Latest Movies Headed To FX

FX said today that it has acquired commercial TV premiere rights to Paramount’s Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol, Sony’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and Fox’s We Bought A Zoo. The deals were completed before year’s end, the network said, … Read More »

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HAMMOND: WGA Nominations Exclude ‘The Artist’ But Don’t Offer Many Surprises

Pete Hammond

WGA Awards Nominations Announced

The Writers Guild nominations seemed to fall right in line with expectations, with one glaring exception. The noticeable absence of Oscar frontrunner The Artist in Original Screenplay was not a diss but simply because that film — written by its director, Michel Hazanavicius — was ineligible under the WGA’s award rules as it was not produced under a guild contract. Mike Mills’ Focus Features film Beginners was similarily ineligible in the Original Screenplay category along with titles like Shame and Margin Call, with Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Drive among those in the Adapted Screenplay lineup.

The Writers Guild, unlike SAG, DGA or PGA, will only consider movies made under their auspices, which means often that likely Oscar nominees in the writing categories are often AWOL at the WGA, which believes these awards should be restricted to union-approved productions. Animated and foreign films also regularly fail to make the cut at WGA but often wind up on the Academy’s list, so the absence of Paramount’s Rango for instance shouldn’t be an indication of its ultimate chances with Oscar.

Certainly The Artist, even though it is a silent film, will likely be nominated by the Academy’s writers branch at the expense of one of the WGA’s strong list of nominees: 50/50, Bridesmaids, Midnight In Paris, Win Win and Young Adult. Terrence Malick’s Cannes winner The Tree of Life, missing from the WGA lineup along with the WGA-ineligible screenplay for the Iranian Oscar entry A Separation, would also appear to be strong contenders to replace one or two of the WGA choices when Academy Award nominations are announced January 24. Read More »

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Christmas Cheer! Better Numbers For New Movies; ‘Mission: Impossible’ Still #1; Spielberg’s ‘War Horse’ Exceeds Predictions

B.O. Brawl: Warner Bros Demands Recount From Paramount & Sony

TUESDAY AM: 8TH UPDATE: Full weekend wrapup coming… Refresh for latest…

Christmas Day box office numbers for North America are up +60% compared to New Years Eve for the new holiday releases and as much as +86% for the weekend frontrunner Paramount’s Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, and +104% for Warner Bros’ Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows in second place. As for the No. 1 movie, director Brad Bird’s Tom Cruise-Jeremy Renner starrer is definitely going to outgross the M:I franchise’s last actioner which did $135M domestic and $270M overseas. My sources say M:I4 is heading to $175M domestic and $400M overseas — with a budget estimated at $145M. Also, Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-buzzed War Horse for DreamWorks/Disney opened in 2,376 theaters today and is overperforming with nearly $7.5M jumping into 3rd place. And that’s despite its 2-hour, 26-minute running time which means fewer screenings. Also opening today is New Regency/Summit Entertainment’s sci-fi thriller The Darkest Hour which debuted today in 2,324 theaters with $2.5M. Fox’s Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked falls to 6th place, while the studio’s We Bought A Zoo moves up a notch to 5th, and Paramount’s The Adventures Of Tintin drops to 7th. More later.

As predicted, Christmas Eve grosses were very soft. (And many international theaters particularly in Europe close early on Christmas Eve and on Christmas.) Paramount’s Mission: Impossible: Ghost Protocol is still having the holiday season’s strongest start for #1. Either Tom Cruise’s career is back from the brink or else moviegoers are in the mood for a full-frills actionfest with heartstopping stunts — or both. The fourquel is showing that this franchise has freshened successfully. Warner Bros’ Sherlock Holmes: Game Of Shadows is holding in 2nd place, but it was supposed to win the weekend. Guy Ritchie’s thriller just wasn’t thrilling enough for audiences. And its disappointing start shows how fickle fans can be when it comes to movie stars like Robert Downey Jr. Another big surprise is the underperformance of Twentieth Century Fox’s family fare threequel Alvin And The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked which may show more life over the next week. Sony Pictures’ The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is the only major studio wide release that’s R-rated this holiday period. So its lackluster grosses are such a surprise (especially because adults are flocking to specialty box office hits like Fox Searchlight’s The Descendants and The Weinstein Co’s The Artist). Maybe fans of the Steig Larsson novel were satisfied by last year’s Swedish film and weren’t feeling David Fincher’s Hollywood version. But business could pick up next week. Paramount/Sony’s The Adventure Of Tintin is already a hit overseas. But these domestic grosses underwhelm for a Steven Spielberg/Peter Jackson collaboration. Then again, Americans don’t have a clue who the Belgian boy hero is.  Twentieth Century Fox suffered yet another disappointing debut when its holiday heartwarmer We Bought A Zoo opened really weak despite stars Matt Damon-Scarlett Johansson and director Cameron Crowe and heavy TV advertising and two rounds of national sneaks to build word of mouth. You’d think all those animals would have put more people in seats, like the studio’s previous hit Marley & Me, especially with an ‘A’ CinemaScore. Speaking of animals, Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-buzzed War Horse from DreamWorks/Disney opens Sunday in 2,376 theaters and is projected to make $4.5M on Sunday and $8M Monday. Its 2-hour, 26-minute running time means fewer screenings. Question is whether this is family or adult fare.

But just when the Grinch stole Hollywood’s moviegoers comes the stat that overall box office this 3-day weekend is -22% compared to last year. But the 4-day wholiday looks to be up 3% vs last year which also included Christmas Eve. Monday is a U.S. national holiday so look for better box office. That’s when we’ll see clarity on whether the entire holiday period will bring out moviegoers for what is now the very important New Year’s weekend which may lead to much better multiples and totals than usual. Latest Top 10 (order determined by weekend gross):

1. Mission: Impossible: Ghost Protocol (Paramount) Week 2 [3,448 Runs]
Debuted Friday December 16 in limited release; Expanded Tuesday night December 20; Officially went wide Wednesday December 21
Tuesday $1.7M, Wednesday $8.9M (including $2M midnights), Thursday $6.2M, Friday $9.7M, Saturday $6.1M
3-Day Weekend $26.5M, 4-day Holiday $40.2M
Domestic Cume $72.6M, International Cume $130M (from 50 markets)

2. Sherlock Holmes: Game Of Shadows (Warner Bros) Week 2 [3,703 Runs]
Opened wide Friday December 16
Wednesday $4.2M, Thursday $4.8M, Friday $6.7M, Saturday $5M
3-Day Weekend $17.8M (-55%), 4-Day Holiday $25M
Domestic Cume $83.8M, International Cume $46.1M (from 25 markets)

3. Alvin & The Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (Fox) Week 2 [3,726 Runs]
Opened wide Friday December 16
Wednesday $3.5M, Thursday $3.9M, Friday $5.4M, Saturday $2.8M
3-Day Weekend $13.3M (-43%), 4-Day Holiday $21.1M
Domestic Cume $58.1M, International Cume $42.1M (from 52 markets)

4. The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (Sony) NEW [2,914 Runs]
Debuted Tuesday night December 20; Opened Wednesday December 21
Tuesday $1.6M, Wednesday $5M, Thursday $3.1M, Friday $4.6M, Saturday $2.5M
3-Day Weekend $13M, 4-Day Holiday $20M
Domestic Cume $28.5M, International Cume $950K

5. The Adventures Of Tintin 3D (Paramount) NEW [3,087 Runs]
Opened Wednesday December 21
Wednesday $2.3M, Thursday $2.4M, Friday $3.5M, Saturday $2.4M
3-Day Weekend $9.1M, 4-Day Holiday $14.3M
Domestic Cume $22.3M, International Cume (Sony) $240M

6. We Bought A Zoo (Fox) NEW [3,117 Runs]
Friday $3M, Saturday $1.9M
3-Day Weekend $7.8M, 4-Day Holiday $11.7M
International Cume $1.1M (from 6 markets)

Read More »

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Which 2011 Christmas Movies Are Hottest?

Attending a movie on Christmas Day is becoming more and more of a tradition for U.S. moviegoers, so MovieTickets.com conducted a week-long survey to predict which release will get the most holiday attention this year, asking the question: … Read More »

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