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EMMYS: ‘True Detective’, ‘Fargo’ & Other Hopefuls Continue TV’s Rich Legacy (Analysis)

Awardsline logo_use this onetrue dYou may have heard that we are living in a glorious age of television, one where the biggest movie stars leap unceremoniously from the cineplex to the now-nontoxic small screen. An era of event programming and limited series, where stories of anti-heroes and the underbelly of the American Dream are being revealed simultaneously on broadcast networks, cable channels and streaming services. Television suddenly has become prestigious.

You may have heard all this, but that doesn’t make it true.

Point Foundation Point Honors New York 2014“It’s not like TV has suddenly become amazing and great — it’s always been amazing and great,” declares Under The Dome executive producer Neal Baer. He should know, having earned his stripes for almost 30 years on network shows such as Law & Order: SVU and ER. Baer has seen TV’s long arc bend back many times. “There was crap, but I could start listing path-breaking television series that thought about racism and drug abuse,” he says.

What’s new today is that TV is a creation of quantity as much as quality, with many more outlets and platforms to grab high-value consumers’ attention with content that up until just a decade ago would have made its home solely in the movies. We have traditional TV trying to recoup some of the luster it lost to non-advertiser-supported programming, but either way, the economics and creativity sit squarely in the small screen’s favor. One need only look at anthologies such as HBO’s True Detective or limited event series like Fox’s 24: Live Another Day or CBS’ Under The Dome to see that the torch is being carried on. Read More »

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Paul Rudd And ‘Anchorman 2′ Castmates Storm ‘SNL’: Video

SNL Paul Rudd Bill BraskyHost Paul Rudd and his Anchorman 2 cohorts Will Ferrell, Steve Carell, and David Koechner kept the promo train chugging along for Ron Burgundy’s December 18 return to screens last night on Saturday Night Live. First Anchorman 2 cast mate and former SNL grand dame Kristen Wiig lampooned NBC’s universally panned The Sound Of Music Live in a cold open featuring Dooneese, then the Anchorman 2 gang backed Rudd in a monologue face-off against boy band One Direction. They closed the show with a Bill Brasky sketch penned by Anchorman director/co-writer Adam McKay, reviving the character first created by Ferrell and McKay. Check out the Channel 4 News team moonlighting on SNL and other highlights below (opening monologue video not available):

Hit the jump for more video clips. Read More »

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Vinnie Jones Set For ABC’s ‘Galavant’ Pilot; NBC’s ‘Sound Of Music’ Casts Kids & Rolfe

By | Friday November 1, 2013 @ 8:49am PDT
Nellie Andreeva

Vinnie Jones is the first actor cast in ABC’s single-camera pilot Galavant, a comedy fairytale written by The Neighbors creator Dan Fogelman, with Oscar-winning composer Alan Menken attached to write the music. Produced by ABC Studios, Galavant centers on handsome Prince Galavant and his quest for revenge over the king who stole his one true love. Jones, repped by Innovative Artists, Elevate and Stone, Meyer, will play Gareth, King Galahad’s badass, scary Scottish henchman. He is onscreen in Escape Plan.

NBC’s holiday special The Sound of Music Live! has set the von Trapp children and Rolfe. Cast as Maria’s (Carrie Underwood) charges and Capt. Georg von Trapp’s (Stephen Moyer) kids are Ariane Rinehart (Liesl), Michael Nigro (Fredrich), Ella Watts-Gorman (Louisa), Joe West (Kurt), Sophia Caruso (Brigitta), Grace Rundhaug (Marta) and Peyton Ella as young Gretl. Another newcomer, Michael Campayno will play Rolfe, a messenger boy who is in love with Liesl until he joins the Nazis. Campayno’s uncle, Joseph Campayno, is NBC special’s makeup artist. He is with manager Geoff Soffer and attorney is Michael Mahan.

Related:
NBC Adds Trio To Live ‘Sound Of Music’

NBC To Air ‘Sound Of Music’ Live Show Dec. 5

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