Terry Gilliam On His Passion For ‘Zero Theorem’

By | Thursday August 22, 2013 @ 11:33am PDT
Mike Fleming

Related: Fleming Q&As Terry Gilliam On His Venice-Bound ‘Zero Theorem,’ More

Before he unveils it at the Venice Film Festival, director Terry Gilliam wanted to say a few things about his film The Zero Theorem, which stars Christoph Waltz and will be looking for a domestic distribution deal at the festival. Somebody leaked his statement on the matter before he had finished his thoughts. He’d like another shot at explaining and let’s face it, it is no easy task to explain a Terry Gilliam film in a short burst. Here is what he wanted to say:

When I made Brazil in 1984, I was trying to paint a picture of the world I thought we were living in then. The Zero Theorem is a glimpse of the world I think we are living in now.

Pat Rushin’s script intrigued me with the many pertinent questions raised in his funny, philosophic, and touching tale.

For example: What gives meaning to our lives, brings us happiness? Can we ever find solitude in an increasingly connected, constricted world? Is that world under control or simply chaotic?

We’ve tried to make a film that is honest, funny, beautiful, smart and surprising; a simple film about a complex modern man waiting for a call to give meaning to his life; about inescapable relationships and the longing for love; peopled with captivating characters, mouthfuls of wise and witty dialogue; raising questions without offering easy answers. Hopefully, it’s unlike any film you have seen recently; no zombies, no caped crusaders, no aliens or gigantic explosions. Actually, I might have lied about that last item.

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Fleming Q&As Terry Gilliam On His Venice-Bound ‘Zero Theorem,’ Don Quixote And Hollywood’s Big Budget Fixation

By | Tuesday August 13, 2013 @ 4:27pm PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: While I was exiting a panel at Comic-Con in San Diego last month, a voice over the loudspeaker in Hall H said there was going to be a surprise look at The Zero Theorem, the new film by Terry Gilliam. After a conspiratorial intro in which Gilliam said he’d been kidnapped and laid out the plot, he proceeded to show the first 10 minutes of his movie. It introduced a brightly colored, high-tech futuristic world and a hairless protagonist (Christoph Waltz) who wants only to be away from the bombardment of messages and find a purpose in this noisy world. David Thewlis, newcomer Melanie Thierry also star, and Matt Damon’s in the movie too. The images were textbook Gilliam, but the circumstances were highly unusual. Film distributors usually lobby to get Hall H space at the Con; this film was financed by Voltage’s Nicolas Chartier after Gilliam failed yet another attempt to make his film The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. A distributor probably won’t be in place until after the film premieres at Venice. Gilliam and cohorts arranged Comic-Con with a phone call: Whether for his Monty Python artistry, 12 Monkeys, Time Bandits or Brazil, Gilliam is an icon to the geek crowd. Intrigued, I seized the chance to talk with him about the film. Gilliam is no stranger to struggling with studios and budgets (The Adventures Of Baron Munchausen, for instance), but he finds today’s Hollywood summer film gambles to be dizzying. And at a time when production and marketing costs have hit unimaginable heights, Gilliam made The Zero Theorem for closer to what he spent directing Monty Python And The Holy Grail back in 1975 than the going price of a blockbuster these days.

DEADLINE: That 10minutes of The Zero Theorem you showed at Comic-Con established a world where the protagonist is assaulted by advertising messages that speak directly to him. Aren’t we already being assaulted that way?
GILLIAM: It’s a pain in the ass, all this technology. It’s all around you. In some ways, it’s good. Just yesterday, we were doing work — people in several different countries, working on the same project at the same time, communicating with others. That intrigues me.

DEADLINE: It also plays well into the totalitarian themes you’ve occasionally explored. Brazil seems like old-school repression compared to what is possible in a tech world where you can’t hide.
GILLIAM: That obsesses me of late. How can you be alone? I have a house in Italy; we’re up on a hilltop. There is no phone, no television and no Internet. We have to drive down to the local village and go to the local bar, which has Wi-Fi, to look at email. I prefer this, but when making films, this technology couldn’t be better for us. It makes life simpler, makes it possible for a guy who is a good matte painter to not have to be in the office next to me. He can do it in his log cabin in Oregon. But the other side is having the NSA keeping tabs on everything you do. And there’s Amazon, constantly suggesting to me all the things I need to buy. Fuck off! Read More »

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Terry Gilliam Sets David Thewlis, Tilda Swinton For ‘The Zero Theorem’

By | Monday October 1, 2012 @ 10:31am PDT
Mike Fleming

EXCLUSIVE: Terry Gilliam has set David Thewlis, Tilda Swinton, Moonrise Kingdom‘s Lucas Hedges and French actress Melanie Thierry (The Princess Of Montpensier) to join Christoph Waltz in … Read More »

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UPDATE: Toronto: Terry Gilliam Confirms Christoph Waltz For ‘Zero Theorem’

Mike Fleming

UPDATE, 4:22 PM: TOLDJA! Look what Terry Gilliam posted on his Facebook wall this afternoon:

Announcement! I’m heading of to Bucharest to start work on my new film, The Zero Theorem. It stars everybody’s favorite Nazi, the great Christoph Waltz. Very original script about a man waiting for a telephone call that will give meaning to his life. Some other things happen as well. It’s profound and funny in more or less equal measures. We’re going to have fun. I’ll keep you posted as the cast expands.

PREVIOUS, MONDAY, 12:34 PM: EXCLUSIVE: Christoph Waltz has been set to star in The Zero Theorem, the next film to be directed by Terry Gilliam. Waltz will play Qohen Leth, an eccentric and reclusive computer genius plagued with existential angst who works on a mysterious project aimed at discovering the purpose of existence—or the lack thereof—once and for all.

It will be the next film for Waltz, who, after winning the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for Inglourious Basterds, has been shooting Tarantino’s follow up, Django Unchained.
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