Check Out Our New Look

‘Hawaii Five-O’ Takes Stunt Writing To Next Level: Fans To Create Episode’s Story Line

By | Friday October 11, 2013 @ 6:13pm PDT

It wasn’t enough for the makers of Hawaii Five-O to let viewers pick the ending of an episode last season, now they’re giving fans control over a full hour. CBS today unveiled its Fan Built Five-O initiative, a Mad Libs-esque stunt that lets the public vote online for an episode’s half-dozen key story points: scene of the crime, victim, murder weapon, evidence, suspect and takedown. After the polls close on Halloween, the show’s writers will use the winning elements to forge a script. Before production on the episode begins in February, fans will be able to weigh in on such things as wardrobe, props, music and the title. The series hula-ed over to Fridays this season, and after two episodes McGarrett, Danno and company’s ratings are down 21 percent in the demo compared with last year. But it’s up by nearly that percentage in total viewers (9.6 million) on the older-skewing night, which CBS is dominating. Hence the web-voted story ploy targeting the less chronologically challenged. And TV writers thought reality formats were a threat to their livelihoods. Check out the categories and options up for balloting after the jump:

Related: CBS Denied Exit From ‘Hawaii Five-O’ Lawsuit

Read More »

Comments 21

Staffing Season Highlights: Who Got Hottest Jobs, Which Shows Attracted Most Writers

Nellie Andreeva

Another TV staffing season is coming to a close as, one by one, writers rooms of new and returning series are convening to work on the 2011-12 orders. Overall, “it was a healthy staffing season,” one industry insider said, while another was lamenting the system, in which prospective writers meet on 80+ pilots in the run-up to the upfronts, only a quarter of which would make it to series and actually hire scribes.

Of the new series, comedies New Girl on Fox, Two Broke Girls on CBS and Apartment 23 on ABC were sought after by writers this year. Joining New Girl creator Liz Meriwether are Joe Port and Joe Wiseman as co-executive producers as well as J.J. Philbin and Josh Malmuth. Three established comedy writer-producers will work alongside Two Broke Girls co-creator/executive producer Michael Patrick King — Greg Malins, Jhoni Marchinko and Michelle Nader, all as consulting producers. On ABC’s Apt. 23, joining EPs Nahnatchka Khan and Dave Hemingson are Casey Johnson & David Windsor (It Takes a Village) and Sally Bradford as co-executive producers.

Writers seemed split on the drama side this year. “Some gravitated toward the big-idea, big-swing shows like Once Upon a Time, The River and Pan Am, others wanted nothing to do with them, opting to go for more standard procedurals like Person of Interest, Prime Suspect and Unforgettable,” one source said. “A lot of writers are thinking about job security.” Also of note is that Josh Friedman’s Locke & Key script was a favorite among writers looking for staff jobs this season despite Fox passing on the pilot. Read More »

Comments 75

Mosaic Manager Ann Blanchard Joining CAA

EXCLUSIVE (UPDATED BELOW): There’s been no announcement yet. But Ann Blanchard is already being accused of breaking Hollywood protocol by not first informing those agents repping her Mosaic Media Group’s TV management clients of her change of employment. Instead, she’s calling those clients today and trying to take them with her to CAA. As a result, agencies who gave her clients to manage are calling me spitting mad. For instance, UTA reps Mosaic’s TV biz and yet Blanchard today was phoning UTA clients to come with her to CAA. Before moving to Jimmy Miller’s Mosaic where she’s been producing several projects, Blanchard had been a TV lit agent and SVP at the old William Morris Agency and is now calling her former clients from there, too. Blanchard, who wasn’t supposed to start at CAA for another 3 weeks, already has 10 high level clients at the tenpercentery including Amy Brenneman, Ed Redlich, Alexa Junge, Doug Petrie, and TV director Michael Dinner. I’ve been hearing that CAA wants to widen its writers / creators / showrunners list after what is well known to be several ”off” years packaging pilots and down this year as well. Remember that movies are the glitz of the agency biz but TV is the cash cow.

UPDATE: Ann Blanchard just told me: “I feel terrible about this reaction and of course want to make clear that I truly value my relationships with all the agencies. I’m in the process of calling all the high-level agents I’ve worked with over the course of this weekend. … Read More »

Comments 69

Broadcast Networks Are Open To Pitches …But Where Are The Available TV Writers?

By | Thursday August 5, 2010 @ 12:30pm PDT
Nellie Andreeva

It’s like broadcast TV industry’s version of a hangover. It’s already August, the marketplace should be bustling with business but only a few pitches have trickled in so far. “We’re very late this year,” a network topper tells me. Why is that? Some point to the last selling season which was so long and bruising, by the end of it everyone felt exhausted. “We all took a collective break,” one top TV lit agent says. Also, there are a lot of new scripted series — 38 — picked up by the broadcast nets for next season, almost 60% more than the 24 new series ordered last year. That, coupled with the increased volume of original series on cable, made fewer writers available to develop this year. A non-writing producer told me he has never gotten so many “not available” answers from TV lit agents when inquiring about writers.

What’s more, I hear the major studios this year don’t allow writers staffed on first-year shows to develop. The general practice had been for scribes working on new series where they would be paid as much as $40,000-$50,000 an episode to regularly take time off to pitch their own projects or work on drafts of their own pilot scripts. “We don’t want them distracted, we want them focused on those 13 episodes,” a studio head said. Read More »

Comments 25